Kamikaze Code: The Ethical Philosophy Of The Bushido Code

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The concept of Kamikaze attack is applied from an ethical philosophy of Japanese feudalism called Bushido code, literally translates into the way of the warrior. The code controls the behavior and protocol of the military guards of the shogun known as Samurai. The book of the samurai, Hagakure, written by Yamamoto Tsunetomo claimed that Bushido code is frequently been compared to the code of chivalry of the European knights with the similar aim to provide a code of honor and rules for living for the country’s armed forces. The philosophy of Bushido is derived from the combination of four religions: Buddhism, Chu-Tzu, Confucianism, and Shinto, emphasizing the loyalty to one’s superior, courage, obedience, responsibility, stoicism, honor, self-discipline, …show more content…
Bushido also teaches the warrior stoicism as a necessity virtue to embrace death when facing the enemy. Tsunetomo explained the warrior’s preparation method for death that “the Way of the Samurai is, morning after morning, the practice of death, considering whether it will be here or be there, imagining the most slightly way of dying, and putting one’s mind firmly in death”. Evidently, this method requires the warrior to confront death everyday regardless whether in the actual physical battle or the mental one, which implies that the warrior’s only real choice is to always choose death over life. Correspondingly, Bushido further teaches about the nobility of dying in the battle; facing the death is more honorable than losing or surrender. If soldiers are surrendered or captured and become a prisoner of war, then they will instantly lost their dignity as a warrior. The ancient Samurai tradition of Seppuku, also called Harakiri, a ritualized form of voluntary suicide, has been traditionally regarded in Japanese culture as a tragic yet honorable way for a Samurai who lose the battle or failed to accomplish the mission, symbolizing the pain brought on by …show more content…
The Japanese military traditions connects the Japanese heritage through fighting by either win or die in the battle as the way to honor them. During the pre-World War II era, the nationalist government inherently promoted the ideology of Bushido, specifically a willingness to die for Japan as a righteous action to encourage the virtues of traditional warrior to the emperor and the country. The book Kamikaze Attacks of World War II: A Complete History of Japanese Suicide written by Robin L. Rielly, military officers introduced military training subjects into middle and high school curriculum in 1925 where students were required to participate two hours of military drills and five to six hours of military instruction each week. Gradually, the military training subjects created the mindset of Japanese children that fighting and dying for the nation was a heroic action. Certainly, it was undeniable that Japanese students who were selected to the special attack force was perceived as honorable obligation to dedicate oneself for the nation; the perception and peer pressure made the majority of people volunteered to join the forces (Rielly, 2010). When the military sent a message across the country asking for volunteer to join the Kamikaze special attack force, the number of volunteers exceeded the number of

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