Individual Juvenile Strain Theory

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Strain is defined as an overexertion or an excessive demand of resources. Strain is much like asking a student to read a book in the dark. The lack of light strains the eyes and confines the ability to read and comprehend the text. Much like lack of light may make it difficult for someone to read a book, lack of resources and opportunities makes it difficult for some individuals to achieve the goals of society. Individual juvenile strain theory is used to understand and predict criminal deviant behavior that may come in place when an individual is faced with straining circumstances. Individual juvenile strain theory defines elements in a young adult’s life that may affect deviant behavior.
One element, as defined by individual juvenile strain
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(Agnew 335). For example, “peer abuse has been neglected as a type of strain, although data suggest that it is widespread and that it often has a devastating effect on victims” (Agnew 346). To further Agnew’s idea, this emphasizes that abuse from peers is a form of strain as defined by individual juvenile strain theory in which the individual turns to deviance such as drugs or crime to cope with the strainful circumstances in which the individual finds his/herself in. Individual juvenile strain theory posits that negative stimulating events produce a range of negative emotions who in sense lead juveniles to commit crimes. “These events produce a range of negative emotions such as anger, fear, depression, and rage, and these emotional reactions lead to crime either directly or indirectly depending on other contingencies such as coping mechanisms, peer and …show more content…
Individual juvenile strain theory is the framework built from strain that may affect deviant behavior. The strain in an individual’s life has the power to descend the accessibility of opportunities to succeed in society. Individual juvenile Strain theory is defined by elements that foreshadow deviance in juvenile behavior Exposure to negative stimuli, as defined by individual juvenile strain theory, is the factor in which an individual experiences unusual activities that directly or indirectly affects the ability to achieve one’s goals in society. In addition, the loss of positive stimuli strains adolescent individuals when actual or anticipated loss of something significant, either physical or emotional. The disjunction between society’s goals and the means of an individual to achieve them also plays as a contributing factor to define individual juvenile strain theory. All in all, individual juvenile strain theory is defined by elements in a young adult’s life that may affect deviant

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