Justice In To Kill A Mockingbird By Harper Lee

1755 Words 8 Pages
It is the underlying issue in every court case and disagreement between people all over the world; does justice mean equal treatment? Should it? The answer to these questions is a controversial one, but can be answered with the unpopular opinion that no, justice in today’s society and courts does not mean fairness. Justice should be the act of giving consequences to those who deserve, at the level they deserve, without any other factors and influences playing a role. This, unfortunately, is not seen as often as it should be as a result of personal opinions and values. Racism, sexism, religious persecution; all of it will always exist no matter what we do. It isn’t a matter of eliminating it from our lives completely, although that is a great …show more content…
Justice does not mean equal treatment in courts and culture; it should, but it does not. The well known story To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee outlines this question very well in regards to the racism present throughout human history. In the novel, Harper Lee explores the idea of justice through the tales of Jean Louise “Scout” Finch’s childhood stories of her father’s fight against injustice. Atticus Finch is a lawyer who was appointed to defend a black man, Tom Robinson, after he was accused of raping a young white woman. Atticus is a respectable man who disregards racism towards the black people in Maycomb and therefore puts in the effort that gives Tom Robinson a fair fight in court, and seemingly ends up to have the better evidence throughout the whole argument. The swaying of opinions as Atticus defends Robinson can be seen like a wave throughout the courtroom; however, Robinson is still convicted of the crime. This is Harper Lee’s way of showing that justice does not mean fair treatment. Tom Robinson had the better argument and Atticus was able to prove him innocent despite what Mayella and Bob Ewell said. In the end, …show more content…
They believe that racism was in the past and because slavery has ended and wars were fought, the issue is done and over with/ However, this is not the case and racism is definitely not a thing of the past; it is alive and burning through today’s society. Laws do not stop injustice, although they should. Melba Pattillo Beals is an example of this. She was a young black girl in the South immediately following the anti-segregation law to disarm the segregation of blacks and whites in places like school. Integration was beginning and Melba wanted to attend a high school in Little Rock, Arkansas. Despite the law, they would not let her into the building and pushed her away because of her race. She fought and fought until someone let her in, but once they did, she regretted it immediately. People called her names and abused her physically an mentally just for being a different race. The law being passed wasn’t going to change the way that they thought, it was just going to make it easier for white people to attack blacks. Philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau once said “Every law the people has not ratified in person is null and void- is, in fact, not a law.” This describes the issue very well in that the opinions of people are way too strong for any form of government and set of laws to overtake. It is the people that need to work on

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