Jules Chéret: The Most Influential Poster Designer Of The Nineteenth Century

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On May 13, 1836, the most influential poster designer of the later nineteenth century, Jules Chéret was born. Chéret was born to a family of artisans in Paris, France. His father was a typographer and his brother Joseph was a sculptor. By the age of thirteen, Jules ended his formal education and began a three-year apprenticeship to a lithographer. During his apprenticeship he lettered flyers, brochures, posters and funeral announcements. When he was eighteen he worked for multiple lithographers which included Bouasse-Lebel, and later took a course at the Ecole Nationale de Dessin with Lecoq de Boisbaudran. Chéret is credited for enhancing the recognition of chromolithography. By 1866 he established his own firm and continued to pursue lithographic …show more content…
One from Japanese art while the other is from the French eighteenth century style, Rococo. Chéret’s use of the Rococo Style was a response to the condition of French society in the 1870s. Having lost a war and experiencing a decline in industrial production, France needed to keep their leadership in innovation in the arts. Chéret responded by using a style that was significantly French in a time where the French people began doubting themselves. With that said the Rococo style relied on …show more content…
His famous posters features performers from the world of music, dance and theattrical performances. In one poster titled La Loï Fuller, (1893,fig. 2) the American dancer spins in an elegant garment that flows around her body and with a multicolored shimmer. Les Girard (1879, fig. 3) is another poster for a performance shows how Chéret embraces the Japanese style. There are even planes of color, that are operated by contour lines. It is with this poster the Chéret dabbled with graphic design, where he intertwined the legs of the the cancers with the the type of the poster. The text and image of the poster were integrated seamlessly by Chéret. Due the freedom that Chéret had with lithography he was able to make the exuberant forms of his letterforms mirror the energetic movements of the

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