Judalism Chapter 1

1622 Words 7 Pages
Chapter 1: IMAGE
JUDAISM 
God as One
Second commandment (A): “You shall have no other gods before me”
Abraham “Father of monotheism”
Distinctiveness of Israel “Gods of the heathens are nought”
Examples:
…show more content…
posture, shape, colour etc.
 Once completed, a consecration ceremony is held by priests recite blessing formula and purify image with substances such as honey and butter, breathing into it, and most importantly uncovering the eyes
 Murit is not the object of adoration and prayer, but functions as a sign of presence of power of transcendent reality, a physical channel of divine energy

What is usually done to the murti during worship? What is darshana and how does the murti facilitate this?
 Darshana – literally means “an audience”, each gesture is meant to represent the cordialities that one would normally extend to an important visitor in one’s house:
– face, arms, and feet of statue are washed or sprinkled with water, then dressed in splendid clothing and adorned with jewellery, flowers, and perfumes. Finally, a meal is prepared and placed before the murti for their consumption.
Nirguna and Saguna
 nirguna – refers to barman, the invisible - difference
 saguna -
…show more content…
Nirmana kaya: physical body => later cremated
2. Sambhoga kaya: enjoyment body=> combination of human and superhuman qualities that symbolise the superior nature of enlightened ones.
3. Dharma kaya: reality body => similar to non-personal absolute Brahman of Hinduism. The transcendent dharma truth is accessible and conceivable to finite minds via enjoyment bodies
Note: Buddhists do not worship the statues, but as Hinduism and sections of Christianity, they are powerful sacramental representations of higher principle that pervades the cosmos, providing intelligibility, meaning, and liberation.
Other Buddhas
– time: previous and future buddhas Eg Maitreya (‘laughing buddha’)
– space: “Pure Land” buddhas (Table 1.1) Eg. Amitabha (Western buddha)
– Use of statues in temples and

Related Documents