Ju/Hoansi Lifestyle Essay

1358 Words 6 Pages
Register to read the introduction… Lee’s book about the Ju/‘hoansi lifestyle today show how much change has been made in !Kangwa and the Dobe area and the advantages and disadvantages which reflect these changes. The population in !Kangwa has increased from 108 people to 300 people and has now developed into an administrative center. Schools, water systems, radiotelephone systems, clinics and airstrips have been built and new laws have been established.(Lee, 2003) As gun laws were tightened, the hunting and gathering lifestyle of the Jus have decreased remarkably. The diet of the Ju/‘hoansi now consists of powdered milk, meat, farmed vegetables and other domestic stock. It has been observed by Lee that the change in diet has resulted in a decrease in general health and an increase in the rates of diseases such as hypertension and heart problems. The increase in tobacco and alcohol consumption and the inefficient preparation, storage and consumption of food also contributed to poor physical and mental health in the Ju …show more content…
The first school was built in !Kangwa in January 1973.(Lee, 2003) Herero and Tswana students ages 5 to 10 were taught to read and write.(Lee, 2003) They studied English, Mathematics, Music, Art and Bible study.(Lee, 2003) However, there were no Ju children who were enrolled in the school due to claims of school fees being too expensive and complaints about the location of the school being too close to the area where heavy drinking took place. Parents were also reluctant to let their children attend school because the use of their own language was forbidden. This shows how much the Ju people value their culture and traditions. However, after realizing the importance of literacy and numeracy, parents have become more willing to provide their children with an …show more content…
The market for the alcohol and tobacco industry has grown significantly and agriculture and stock raising have also improved. Craft marketing for ostrich eggshell bead necklaces and other handmade craftwork have been very popular with tourists. Making necklaces, bracelets and headbands out of shells used to be an essential part of their culture and continues to be. (Peaceful Societies: Alternatives to Violence and War, 2012) Anthropologists Megan Biesele and Nancy Howell (1981) described how the elders would instruct the younger Jus in the proper ways of making bead gifts, which they would then give away in order to form reciprocal, giving relationships. This portrays how the Jus have successfully adapted to new conditions while preserving their traditional core values of

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