Joshua Foer The End Of Memory Analysis

887 Words 4 Pages
What do you do with your thoughts? A long time ago, there was no paper to scribe thoughts onto or computers to record them. There was nothing to do with thoughts, but remember them. Anything worth preserving had to be preserved in memory. In the essay, “The End of Remembering” by Joshua Foer, memory is an important issue. Different tools for remembering are discussed. In the course of time, a series of technologies have been created: the alphabet, scrolls, the printing press, photography, the computer, and the smartphone. Advancements in technology have made it progressively easier to externalize memories. Foer believes there is something great at stake by using technology to store memories instead of the brain. I agree with Feer’s concern. …show more content…
In Foer’s essay, different inventions are used to recall information. For example, early in history, people recited stories. This was the only way to spread knowledge. Memorization was imperative. There was a deep understanding of the information. Except, the brain has a limited capacity. Then civilizations began writing information down. At first, writing was not organized, because there was no proper punctuation and spacing, so it was challenging to decipher. Memorization was still needed, but the lines of writing gave clues. The hints helped remember information. The information was recalled upon, but only as much as what was written. Later on, the writing structure improved. Instead of using scrolls, books were created. Around the same time, games were created to help recall information. However, games were not as successful as the books to help remember. An example of a memorization game included matching letters to pictures. The drawings would help to remember material. Also, a game by Marc Twain was created to help retain sundry facts, but books are easier to recall information …show more content…
People accumulate memories of facts by integrating them into a network. People also accumulate life experiences by integrating them into a web of other chronological memories. In the essay Foer said, “You don’t have to be a reactionary, fundamentalist, or a Luddite to wonder whether plugging brains into computers would ultimately be such a terrific idea” (Foer 174). How are people willing to lose from their lives by losing themselves in their Blackberries, their iPhones, by not paying attention to the human being across from them who is talking with them, by being so lazy that are not willing to process deeply? If a person wants to live a memorable life, you have to be the kind of person who remembers to remember. The fact that books today are mostly a string of words makes it easier to forget the text. With the impact of the iPad and the future of the book being up for re-imagination, Foer wonders whether people will rediscover the importance of making texts richer visually. People have forgotten how to remember. Instead of using your smartphone to jot down crucial notes, or Googling an elusive fact, use every opportunity to practice your memory skills. Memory is a muscle, to be exercised and

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