John Wycliffe's Influence On The Church

Great Essays
When John Wycliffe and John Huss walked the earth, the Roman Catholic Church was a predominant influence in the life of most Europeans. At this point in history, unrest in the church began to grow. These men were among the first who wanted to see reform in the church who had grown increasingly political and wished to fix the doctrine of the church. John Wycliffe and John Huss desired to stop the corruption that had risen within the Catholic church and their lives were devoted in hopes of cleaning up the Church and restoring it.
John Wycliffe The birth of John Wycliffe is uncertain. Scholars go back in forth about where he was born. Per John Leland as cited in John Wycliffe and His English Persecutors, there is no history of the village known
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Then he went and spoke before the Parliament of 1366 speaking that the Pope ought to pay the tribute money. This Parliament would forever be known as the moment Wycliffe hit the scene. Wycliffe proceeded to publish a pamphlet that was filled with seven speeches by men who all disagreed with the Pope trying to make England pay tribute. In his writings, he made it clear that he was not against the papacy, but rather the abuse of their authority. Then in 1370 he was officially ruled as not being a part of Canterbury Hall. Wilson calls him “the more star of reformation” because though he never saw what would become of his work of the tribute-money and Parliament of 1366, what he did would be path that others would follow. Then in 1374, he was made Royal Commissioner to Burges. Though Wycliffe was been disappointed by the result of his failed mission at Burges, but he was granted the parish of Lutterworth because of his esteem in 1375. Then in 1377 the hierocracy was against Wycliffe and called him before the Convocation. Then on February 19, 1377 he appeared at the Convocation held at St. Paul’s while armed men, the Duke, and other important officials of the time tried to make their way into the building. When the men finally got in they say a weak Wycliffe and the Duke began the scream back and forth with the Bishop …show more content…
Some believe it is as late as 1372. He came from a poor family and his father died at an early age. He went to elementary school in Prachatice about 1385. Then in 1390 his mother followed him to school and to Prague because she cared so much for him. By 1393 Huss had earned a bachelor’s degree from Prague. Then in just three years he had earned his master’s degree while still being at Prague. Then in 1401, John Huss was ordained as a priest. Then in 1402 he became the preacher at Bethlehem Chapel and the rector of the University of Prague. 1403 the 45 theses of Wycliffe were forbidden to be taught by universities. Two years after this Huss was put in charge of investigating “the holy blood of Wylsnack (Schaff 1915).” Approximately three years later, 1408, Huss writes Commentary on the Sentences of the Lombards. The following year Alexander V is elected and starts trying to stop Wyclifism. Then in a turn of events Huss agrees with Wycliffe in the public sector in 1410. In this same year he also appeals to John XXIII, and is cited by the Cardinal Colonna in Rome. In 1411 Huss is officially excommunicated from the Roman Catholic church. Later this year he also has to deal with a controversy with John Stokes. Huss then runs away from Prague for safety in 1412, and John

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