John Wayne Gacy: Characteristics And Characters Of A Serial Killer

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The Oxford dictionary defines a serial killer as a person who murders three or more people, usually in service of abnormal psychological gratification, with the murders taking place over more than a month and including a significant break, known as a "cooling off period” between them. Many characteristics or signs can be displayed by a serial killer that they do not have any control over. Some of these characteristics and signs being: very antisocial, arson, early childhood abuse, peeing the bed, extreme intelligence, killing small animals, and many others (Frese, Susan). Most of these characteristics and signs can take place in their early to mid-childhood, however some of these actions may carry over into the later years of their life. This …show more content…
After hearing the news, Gacy confessed to killing “about 25 or 30” people who he claimed were runaways or male prostitutes. On February 6th 1980, he was tried in Cook County, Illinois and charged with thirty-three murders. Gacy tried to convince a psychologist that he suffered from multiple personality disorder, and his lawyers tried to plead not guilty due to insanity. Neither of those two tactics were accepted, and Gacy was sentenced to twelve life sentences. Gacy spent the rest of his life in Menard Correctional Center and was put to death on May 9th, 1994 (Nelson, …show more content…
Manson was born to Walker Scott and Kathleen Maddox, and Manson didn’t have any brothers or sisters. Manson’s mother was only sixteen when she gave birth to him, she was also an alcoholic and a prostitute. Soon after Manson’s birth came an end to Manson’s parents’ marriage, and Manson was put into an all-boys school. Manson ended up running back to his mother, however Manson’s mother wanted nothing to do with him, which resulted in Manson having to live on the streets. The neglect of his mother, and lack of a father figure affected how Manson’s mind was shaped, his actions and how he lived. Manson soon became involved in small petty crimes, which is how he was able to survive on the streets. Manson’s crimes soon began to catch up with him, and Manson had to spend half of the thirty-two years of his life in prison. Manson was described by probation as suffering from a marked degree of rejection, instability and psychic trauma, as well as always striving for a high status and some form of love (Early Life of Charles

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