John The Savage Character Analysis

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Throughout his novel, Brave New World, Aldous Huxley demonstrates a dystopian society, in which he provides instances that are closely and figuratively parallel to those in today’s society. Something distinct in Brave New World from other novels, is the novel’s innovative use of its main character, John the Savage. John contrasts from the general frame of a standard main character's structure of being introduced in the beginning of a novel and plagued with a negative situation, only to overcome that situation and develop a personal growth. By not having a character in the beginning of his novel, Huxley creates a scene void of personability. Thus translating that in order to understand this society, one would have to leave every comfort zone …show more content…
With the illustrated instances of human conditioning and erratic sexual behaviors, Huxley creates a theme of danger in the future. When John is introduced, he juxtaposes his society's views. Even with aspects of religion, John refutes Mustapha’s values, by announcing that religion is something that will always be a part of man. At this moment, John is not truly growing. He was presented in the story, from the start, to disagree with his society. Rather, this is a voice for his society; that they should not allow someone to form their ideas and beliefs. Religion is a major aspect in today’s society, and by Huxley introducing John to serve as the “black sheep” in this civilization, Huxley is using John as a guide. John is rule breaking consistently. He countermeasures those in charge, and even commits suicide towards the end of the story. His suicide is not an extremely far-fetched concept for that of John. Since he did not begin the novel with any weaknesses or shortcomings, the bond is not entirely strong with his character. He was introduced as a self-assured individual, who had already looked to design his own world. The only thing is that society is becoming worse. As he realizes more about the faults of civilization, he becomes more erratic. His behavior is consistent with his situation, but the reason why it seems to become more bold, is because of the things he knows deeper in society. For example, he begins by disapproving the use of drugs and uncontrollable sex, to reaffirming his right to religion, to asserting that humans have the right to feel sadness, to later committing suicide because he cannot find a just society. This serves to show that his self-assuredness, brought in the middle of the novel, has the ability to understand injustice. There

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