Radical Freedom In Sartre's Existentialism

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Many philosophers have a challenging time when approaching the idea of the meaning of life. Sartre’s convincing philosophy on existentialism, humanism and radical freedom aid in discovering a logical meaning regarding human existence. Sartre’s existentialism emphasizes that our existence precedes our essence, our existence puts us in a situation of complete freedom. The version of humanism that Sartre agrees with emphasizes the dignity of human beings, stressing that human choice is the creation of all values. we are entirely responsible for what we become, putting the future of humanity in our own hands. Finally, Sartre's idea of radical freedom is essentially that everyone has a choice, and every act is a free act. When people believe they have 'no choice' but to do something, they are being deceptive towards themselves.
To begin with, as humans we are born into existence
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“We are left alone, without excuse. This is what I mean when I say that man is condemned to be free” (Sartre 32). Because man is not determined by any preordained conceptions of human nature or god, he has absolute freedom and free will. He is to shape his life in whichever way he chooses to do so. However, Sartre takes the Kantian approach (Immanuel Kant) by agreeing that “freedom is a will both to itself and to the freedom of others.” This highlights the idea that a fundamental conception of human existence is freedom. This freedom, confronts man with a radical choice. Thus being, the choice to choose whichever action he commits to. No ethical theory can dictate the correct choice for man to make for himself. There is no right or wrong it is simply what you choose to do. By living with no constraints and completely free you give meaning to your life. According to Sartre having absolute freedom gives man the choice to give meaning to everything they do. Not one person can tell you how to live for meaning, except for

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