John Macwhorter's Nothing Left Unsaid

Improved Essays
Nothing Left Unsaid Passion, sometimes shown in rage, allows us to explore an idea with zest and excitement. Malcolm X, an African American figure who was known for being quite passionate, yet angry, about his cause, is a prime example of how passion can give people the push to pursue causes that are meaningful to them. While he could be very crass and rude, it was only out of this angry passion that he found success as an activist, and gained recognition for his differences. John MacWhorter, an African American professor of linguistics and American studies at the Ivy League, Columbia University, believed that Malcolm X was too angry to be taken seriously and that the rage in his argument distracted from real, meaningful progress in his cause. However, MacWhorter completely overlooks the traits that made Malcolm X distinctive from his fellow activists, and does not take into account the reasons why Malcolm X was taken seriously in his cause that eventually became resolved with the help of his passionate thoughts. Controversy will gain more popularity than the “norm,” because these arguments and thoughts are unique, making them stand out for ideas that most do not have the gut or the confidence to preach. MacWhorter correctly points out, “There is a tacit sense that the kind of anger Malcolm became famous …show more content…
It can be used for morally good or morally evil, but Malcolm X helped millions of African-Americans with his rage. MacWhorter cannot say that Malcolm X’s progress was hindered by his rage because without his rage, I would not even have written this essay before your eyes. Because his presence and his personality could be heard through the words he said, he was able to take step into African-American equality. MacWhorter completely overlooks the reasons why Malcolm X was significant and special. He should appreciate the actions Malcolm X provoked and the changes Malcolm X made to progress society. Anger leaves nothing left

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