John Law's Trial: The Pendle Witch Trial

Improved Essays
The Pendle witch trial begins when Alizon device encountered a peddler named John Law. When Alizon asked John Law to do her a favor, he refused, leading to her anger and a curse being put on him. The curse left John with what was thought to be an illness brought on by a witch. John Law’sfamily took this matter into their own hands, going to the authorities of that time for help. The authorities went and asked Alizon a statement about what happen. They also asked for statements from her family. As the authorities began examining and questioning people they found twelve people in the town that were accused of witchcraft. Alizon confessed to ten acts of witchcraft, five of these confessions were confessions of murder. Alizon confessed that …show more content…
If we look at the supposed crimes today we would find a logical explanation for every one of the crimes that were committed, for example John Law could have just simply have had a stroke. These fear based laws and persecutions led to the death of ten people for commenting crimes that no longer are accredited.

The Bideford Witches In 1862 three women were hanged after being found guilty of being witches in Bideford, North Devon England. These three women are the last three women to be executed after being convicted of witchcraft. The women hold this tragic name in history are Temperance Lloyd, Mary Trembles, and Susanna Edwards. The conviction and hanging of these women left the townspeople baffled. These women were not from a typical village where witches lived, instead they lived in an actual sophisticated town. John Watkins, a historian, wrote the story of the trail to preserve the story in 1792. Watkins did not agree with the conviction of these women. In fact he wrote this statement in his book about the trial, "there was always some poor devil, either on account of an unlucky visage, sour temper, or wretched poverty, set up as the object of terror and universal hatred." (Watkins 1993) The women were not convicted with any actual evidence instead, were convicted based on
…show more content…
Edmunds witch trials were a series of trials that were led by the Witchfinder General, Matthew Hopkins. They occurred in the town of Bury St. Edmunds in Suffolk, England, sporadically between 1645 and 1694. Matthew Hopkins was able to convict and execute 18 people in one day. Matthew Hopkins had learned about witchcraft from the book demonology writien by King James the 1st. After beginning to go on his own witchcraft hunts he wrote his own pamphlet on the matter called ‘The Discovery of Witchcraft’ in 1647. Hopkins first witch was an old lady named Elizabeth Clarke. At the time of her arrest torture had been illegal in London. So Hopkins only interrogated her to find put the location of five other witches. Even though torture had become illegal, Elizabeth was stripped naked and searched for marking of witches. She was also kept with food for a number of days until she became defeated and confessed to being a witch. He treated many other witches with this same treatment to get them all to confess. Matthew Hopkins had found was to torture the accused witch was against the law by finding ways around it. During the Bury St. Edwards trails, Matthew Hopkins imprisoned Around 200 witches. His investigation lead to the discovery of eighteen witches, they were all executed by

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Sarah was a victim throughout the trials, the others girls weren’t okay with her when her “afflictions” declined. Due to the decline they told the villagers she signed the Devil’s book so that no harm would come to her. As a result, Sarah had no choice but to frame others for the witchcraft in order to save her own life. “Sarah confessed that her master George Jacobs Sr. and his granddaughter, Margaret Jacobs, forced her to sign the Devil 's book”. (The “Afflicted” of Salem, Weiser-Alexander) Many of the people she accused of doing the witchcraft were sent to Gallows Hill or prison.…

    • 978 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    The Salem Witch Trials

    • 2310 Words
    • 9 Pages

    Though the Massachusetts general court later annulled guilty verdicts against accused witches and granted indemnities to their families. Bitterness lingered in the community and the Salem witch trials would endure for centuries. Salem village in the 1690’s were pretty much the edge of the settle universe at least as far as the colonist knew. They were afraid of death by starvation, death of exposure, and death by salvages. The puritans soon were convicted of witch trials of Salem because people believed the devil was the cause of all this, they accused older women to being witches but they only chose the ones that were vulnerable to the community.…

    • 2310 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    She was quick to anger and muttered under her breathe. Many people believed these mutterings to be curses that she was placing upon them. Sarah Osborne had already been marked as an outcast when she married her indentured servant.” These accusations should have not been strong enough to determine if it was an act of witchcraft. There was not enough witnesses to say Tituba was telling witch stories. The same goes for Good no one actually heard what came out of her mouth, they only assumed she cursed people.…

    • 1511 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Soon after, other girls were experiencing similar fits. The community was ridden with panic as the witches accused more people including many respected community figures. The Court of Oyer and Terminer was created specifically by Governor William Phips of Massachusetts to handle the trials of these suspected witches. The first person to be hanged as a witch was Bridget Bishop who was hanged at Gallows Hill on June 10th, 1692. About twenty more townspeople were executed for witchcraft and some died while in jail.…

    • 1058 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Due to hysteria the Salem Witch Trials occurred and resulted in the death of twenty innocent villagers. The accused were tried and hanged or even crushed. The accused were also killed without having enough evidence to prove that they were witches. The witch trials began in Salem, Massachusetts during the last weeks of December…

    • 1693 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Critics such as for Proctor were very quickly accused of witchcraft themselves and under the assumption that if anyone denied the existence of witches or tried to defend the accused they must be one of them and were brought to trial themselves. Proctor’s entire family was accused including all his children, his pregnant wife Elizabeth, and his sister-in-law (Web). He was arrested on April 11 and hanged on 19th August. According to a petition by Proctor said that there were innocent people around and they would not confess united beaten to blood (96). New England considered a God’s kingdom was becoming a Satan conspiracy.…

    • 1970 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Many people accused each other of being witches to ensure their own survival, not caring about those they accused. This led to many people being tried and hanged as witches. Through these events, the witch trials revealed three characteristics of humanity that drove the people in Salem to carry out the trials; reputation, self-preservation, and fear. In “The Crucible,” Arthur Miller reveals the flawed side of humanity through characterization, dramatization, and imagery. The first flawed characteristic…

    • 1334 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    A major tragedy in American History occurred known as Salem Witch Hunt. In the year of 1692, 150 women and men had been accused, tortured, arrested, put to trial and charged with the crimes of witchcraft. The Salem witchcraft incident began when two young girls, nine-year old Elizabeth Parris and eleven year old Abigail Williams began to have strange fits. Samuel Parris did not believe that his daughter and niece were bewitched. However, Physician William Griggs believed, “the girls were under an evil hand” .…

    • 1223 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    Back in 1692 the Puritan’s believed “Though shalt not suffer a witch to live.” This created what is known known today as the Salem Witch Trials. All of these terrible and tragic events happened because of three young girls showing signs of outlandish behaviors that were diagnosed as witchcraft. These girls were pressured by Reverend Parris and local magistrates to give the names of witches who were afflicting them. After naming three women the girls were still under the influence of witchcraft. One of the women who was accused, the Parris’s slave Tituba offered a confession and gave the name of nine other witches.…

    • 1695 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This lead to the Putnam family to accused them for their wrong doing. This conflict took place during the same time of the witch trials. Because of this she was accused of witchcraft by the Putnam family; this is where we find the trend for the rest of the trials. Osborn is the only one of the first three to be accused due to personal reasons. She was examined but never attended her trial.…

    • 1061 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays