John Fitzgerald Kennedy's Speech: Ich Bin Ein Berliner

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“Ich bin ein Berliner”: I am a Berliner. This sentence pronounced by John Fitzgerald Kennedy: the President of the United States of America on the 26th day of June in 1963 during his speech in Rathaus Schӧneberg the city hall of West Berlin would shape history. Those words that would later name the speech, may have prevented the Soviet Union from becoming stronger and maybe start a war that would have killed millions of people, those words have encouraged the West Berliners to keep fighting for freedom. The speech was made three years after the construction of the Berlin Wall, the wall separated West Berlin and West Berliners from the Western society: the free world. The wall also separated families and friends; it gave rise to famine and starvation …show more content…
In the Narratio of his speech President Kennedy compares West Berlin to Rome the capitol of the Roman Empire. Once he has gained the public’s endorsement President Kennedy condemns the Soviet Union and so claims his opposition to communism in a Partitio that President Kennedy made very strong by using a brilliant anaphora. The Confirmatio expresses the main claim of John Fitzgerald Kennedy: West Berlin is the pride of the Free World; President Kennedy also explains why the western society is better than the communist system. The leader of the free world finally condemns the Soviet Union and the communist system for their lack of freedom, for denying the elementary right to their people. In is Refutatio what the United President refutes is the Soviet Union and the communist System. To conclude President Kennedy expresses his hopes of the entire Germany to become as free as West Berlin is and he commends again of the West Berliners courage. …show more content…
President Kennedy compares the pride of being a Roman, people had two thousand years ago, to the pride of being a Berliner, every citizen of the Free World should have today. President Kennedy meant that anybody that also fights for Freedom anywhere in the world as West Berliners do is also a Berliner. Comparing Rome, the capitol of the Roman Empire, to Berlin suggests that Berlin is the capitol of the Free World. So the sentence “Ich bin ein Berliner” had to raise a lot of positive emotion in the audience that was essentially made of West Berliners and it had to win the public’s attention and goodwill. The anaphora “Let them come to Berlin” is an important part of President Kennedy’s speech, the people in the public have suffered a lot because of the Soviet Union and Communism (Berlin Blockade, Berlin Wall etc.) so defining them as the “enemy” and stating that working with them is impossible was the only thing President Kennedy could do when he brought up the topic of the Soviet Union in his speech. “President Kennedy, as the good speaker he had always been, never, never forgot who composed his audience.” (Dallek, Robert page 123) The Words “Freedom” and “free” are used almost 20 times in President Kennedy’s

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