John F. Kennedy's Speech: For The Freedom Of Man

Superior Essays
Peter Han
English 015 Section 072
Jessi Harris
September 19, 2015

For the Freedom of Man

Ever since George Washington, presidents have given inaugural speeches in order present their goals and expectations as president to the American people. Though the words of some have been forgotten, others are still memorable today. The memorable addresses have impacted America, not only in the time it was given but also today, where the words spoken by presidents are reflected in the nation the United States has become. When John F. Kennedy was elected president, the Cold War was at its peak. The American people needed a strong and reliable leader to bring back morale and renew faith in their country. In the midst of crisis, Kennedy would deliver one
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This invoked a sense of patriotism into the audience at Kennedy’s inaugural speech and made them feel like they had a duty as Americans to preserve the freedom that their founding fathers had worked so hard for. Kennedy also questions the American people, urging them to, “ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country.” In the same way, he questions the world, saying, “ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.” In questioning the American people and the world, Kennedy forces the people to really think about what they can do to bring justice for themselves and all around them. Kennedy asks the world to unite with America to work towards freedom of man. This appeals to the audience’s sense of responsibility and makes them feel like they can do something to lend a helping hand to those in poverty, misery, or …show more content…
Through his skillful use of rhetoric, he was able to push Americans to look within themselves for change in a world that was seemingly irreparable due to high tensions within the Cold War and communism. He wanted to, “let every nation know, whether it wishes [the United States] well, or ill, that [it] shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe, in order to assure the survival and success of liberty. “ Kennedy wanted all nations to be free and stated that all nations had support and aid of the United States in ceasing oppression. He was willing to make sacrifices and take on challenges such as “burdens” and “hardships” in order to support the common good. He acknowledged the tyranny that existed around the world and pledged to “break the bonds of mass misery,” “[cast] off the chains of poverty,” and“ begin anew the quest for peace.” But he could only do this with the help of man whom he believed “holds in his mortal hands the power to abolish all forms of human poverty and all forms of human life.” His speech intended to rally all people to recognize the impact they could make upon the world in order to make it a better, more peaceful place. People had to look upon themselves and see the power in their “mortal hands” to make a difference in the world and rid it of “misery” and “poverty” in order to

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