John F. Kennedy's Life

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John Fitzgerald Kennedy was born on May 29th, 1917. He was our youngest president to be elected into office and the youngest president to die in office. John Kennedy 's first term in office was cut short, however, Kennedy made strides to make new laws and social programs, Kennedy was on his way to make outstanding laws and programs. Starting from the beginning of his presidency to the cold war and even after his death, John Kennedy was a strong and dependent leader. Because of this, people either hated or loved John F. Kennedy. Through trials and tribulations, John Fitzgerald Kennedy remained the same honest, family oriented man whom all Americans can trust and rely on. The most important people in Kennedy’s life were his family. …show more content…
Before Kennedy formally announced his presidential candidacy in 1960, John campaigned unofficially by speaking to the public and private by his Senate work and reelection (Savage 20). With all the numbers that were coming in, JFK was expected to be victorious by a record-breaking margin (Savage 45). Because of his outstanding victory, his popularity grew all over the East Coast and began to travel to the Midwest and West. Without a doubt, JFK was going to be the Democratic presidential candidate from the first ballot because of how many delegate votes he had already received. Kennedy had an amazing drive, and everything he had, he worked for and earned. This drive to become the president was ultimately fueled by his family. Because John Kennedy’s family had always thought that John would be the least likely to succeed, it pushed John to become the greatest of all his siblings. This had to be something that fueled Kennedy to have a never give up attitude and had pushed him to be the top electoral candidate even though the entire time he seemed to be the underdog. Being a young President, Kennedy had proposed new and innovative ideas to the American …show more content…
The start of the Cuban uprising in 1959 had the United States faced with a dilemma that would challenge the American foreign policy makers to limit trade and negotiations with communist countries (White 3). Leading the Cuban forces was Fidel Castro and leading the Soviets was Nikita Khrushchev. One of the very first attacks in the Cold War was the Bay of Pigs invasion in 1961 (White 5). After the Bay of Pigs, the real battle was against Soviet Russia more than Cuba. With Russia, it was more of a “who has more nuclear weapons” fight to threaten each other and see who would back down first. While threatening times with Cuba were ending, it was still the Soviets who opposed the United States. At Khrushchev’s best, he was more innovative and conciliatory than any leader. But at his worst, he was severely erratic and dangerous (White 30). This may have been part of why Khrushchev had brought nuclear missiles down into Cuba for an attack. The entire war was beginning to get out of hand and there were agreements to resolve the incident as easy as possible. In late October of 1962, it was the start of Soviet removal of all nuclear missiles in Cuba. This process went on without very little incident as the only problem was that Cuba did not want unwelcomed guests to come over and accuse them of anything else. After the Cold War, Kennedy was then

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