Erikson's Psychosocial Analysis

Superior Essays
Emotional development was the focal point of chapter eleven. The chapter provided an overview of Erikson’s theory of psychosocial development, attachment, emotion, temperament and personality, and supporting children who exhibit emotional challenges. Throughout the chapter, bioecological factors were also discussed. As children grow older, they experience multiple changes with regard to their reasoning skills, cognitive processes and language abilities. Additionally, children see changes in their social-emotional domain. Psychodynamic theorist Erik Erikson proposed that children develop from the various changes in life. His eight psychosocial stages consists of age-related conflict that individuals must overcome at in order to gain personal …show more content…
This need is fulfilled throughout our lifespan through the bonds created. A child’s first attachment begins with the infant and the caregiver. Theorists have attempted to create theories between infants and their caregivers. The ethological attachment theory originated by John Bowlby is the perspective that highlights the benefits to children creating strong ties with caregivers. In the process of forming attachment, children learn about themselves and their environment. Bowlby proposed four phases in attachment development. First stage is preattachment (birth-6 to 12 weeks) in which infants use social signals to prompt care from adults. The second stage is attachment in the making (6 to 12 weeks through 6 to 8 months). During this stage, infants turn to care to adults who regularly care for them and begin to recognize the rhythm of interactions between caregivers. Third stage is referred to as clear-cut attachment and it occurs between 6 to 8 months until a year and a half. This stage consists of the infant showing preferential attachment to one person or a small group of regular caregivers. Infants may also display stranger anxiety when they fear unfamiliar adults. The last stage is reciprocal relationship where infants make inferences about their parents and caregivers. They begin to interact with adults so that they take direction from them but also proclaim their desires. During early childhood, young children rely on familiar caregivers, teachers and begin building supportive relationships with peers. Throughout middle childhood and adolescence, relationships with parents may change, as adolescents prefer closer relationships with friends and romantic partners. Theorists have noted individual differences in children’s attachments. The classifications of attachment are the following: secure, insecure-avoidant, insecure-resistant and disorganized and disoriented

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