The Periodic Table: The Discovery Of Elements

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The periodic table we know today is very organized and accurate. It shows all of the elements that have been discovered and has them arranged and by their chemical properties, atomic masses, and electron configurations. In order to construct the periodic table, every element had to be discovered. Elements such as gold, tin, lead, and copper have been widely known and used since ancient times, however, the first discovery of an element wasn’t made until 1649 by Hennig Brand when he discovered phosphorus. Over the next 200 years, chemists would acquire the basic knowledge of the physical properties and compounds of elements leading to the discovery of 63 elements by 1869. With more elements being discovered scientists began to recognize patterns …show more content…
They get their name because their metals or oxides dissolve when placed in water and then become alkaline solutions. For this reason, these elements are rarely found in their natural state in nature and more commonly found as ionic compounds. These metals are solid at room temperature but have a low melting point and are very soft. An example of this would be potassium which can be cut with a knife. However, these metals are extremely reactive with water. When placed in water they produce hydrogen gas, heat and metal hydroxide. The salts in this group are very soluble in water because they have large ions and low densities that can easily be separated. This can be seen when salt (Na) is mixed with water and begins to dissolve forming salt water. Salt also happens to be the 4th most abundant element in the …show more content…
There are eleven elements in this group and they can be found bordering the dividing line between metals and nonmetals. Metalloids typically have a metallic appearance, but are very brittle and are poor electrical conductors. Because they are so brittle metalloids are not usually used for structural uses but can form alloys with other metals. Chemically they act as nonmetals and most of their physical and chemical properties are intermediate in nature. Metalloids and their compounds are also used in electronics, glasses, semiconductors, and pyrotechnics. Silicon (Si) has revolutionized the electronics industry since the early and mid-eighties. Modern electronics relies on the silicon in the integrated

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