John Bowlby's Theory Of Attachment

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A theory that is relevant to change and transition is John Bowlby's 1907-1990 theory of attachment. Bowlby's theory looked at a child's bond with parents and their reaction when separated from their parents. Bowlby was asked by the world health organisation to study the mental health needs of homeless and orphaned children. During his study Bowlby reported the distress children shown when they where separated from their mother. Also Bowlby recognised that children attach themselves to adults that provide their physical needs and this interaction was important in allowing a child to form trusting relationships.
Recognising the importance of Bowlby's theory contributed to changes in services for children. After the Second World War
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A smooth transition ensures a stress free transition and will also ensure that the child has a positive start at the new setting. Alternatively an unplanned transition may cause the child to be distressed and fear of going to the new setting.The quality of the care givers is also an important factor in the settling in process. A warm and responsive adult will install a feeling of calm and security in the child. In his social learning theory, Bandura did an experiment and found that children will model their behaviour on those around them. Throughout their early life children will have a number of models with whom they identify. This show's that the quality of the adults interacting with the child is important. If the adult is positive about the transition the child is more likely to see it as positive experience and will give it a try. The social learning theory also found that the more a child likes or respects the model, the more likely they are to replicate their behaviour. This proves that the practitioners In the setting need to be appropriate as they are so influential. On the other hand if children are around inappropriate adults who do not respond to their needs or show negative attitude this could have a negative effect on the child and they may not want to attend the …show more content…
These children were more confident and curious and were less likely to be bullied. Grossman & Grossman 2009 took this further and found that attachment in early childhood has been seen to effect adult partnerships and parenting. This demonstrates the importance of supporting parents in their role. Berlin (2005) found that skilled and supportive staff working with parents is necessary for success. Promoting secure attachment can be promoted in the setting by providing a key worker. A key worker in the setting is someone in the setting that makes sure the children's basic needs are met.
The key worker approach is a key issue that is important through transitions. A positive aspect of having a key worker is that child will be able to form a positive relationship with their key worker in the setting. Also having a key worker in the setting will make the child feel more safe and secure. On the other hand the child may become to attached to their key worker which will make the child distress and make it more difficult for the child to transition from setting to

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