Attachment Theory In John Bowlby's Study

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Attachment is an emotional tie that bonds one person to another. Attachment theory was brought along by John Bowlby during his psychiatry career. He considered the importance of social, emotional, and cognitive development in parent-child relationships after treating many emotionally disturbed children. This elicited the idea that children’s early experiences with their parents produces a lasting imprint on their lives. Bowlby proposed that attachment experiences influenced the development of internal working models, which are key variables in social behavior in life. (Luke, Maio, and Carnelley). Internal working models include feelings of self-esteem. Essentially, the role of self-esteem in childhood and even later in life, is dependent on …show more content…
In a study by M. Ann Easterbrooks and Robyn Abeles, the correlation between self and attachment theory was researched. “Self” is the reference to inner feelings, organization of attitudes, and expectations that grows throughout infancy and childhood (Easterbrooks & Abeles). Eight-year-old children’s self-evaluations were assessed through interview and subscale. Attachment was measured through a Separation Anxiety Test. Children who had higher views of self were tied to higher emotional security. It is crucial caregivers continuously interact with infants for positive views of the self (Easterbrooks & Abeles). Many theories of the development of the self pose a central role for caregiving relationships in the developmental emergence and formation of the child’s self (Kohut, 1971; Stern, …show more content…
It is implied that the security of a child’s attachment formulates a representational model of the self that includes self-esteem-how worthy he or she is and the value of themselves to others (Verschueren & Marcoen). These expectations of the self are thought to affect success in peer relationships after they are internalized (Verschueren & Marcoen). In a study published in the Journal of School Psychology, a major connection between a child’s peer status and that child’s attachment to their parent was discovered. The study revealed that a high attachment security score lowered the odds by 71% of belonging to the rejected status group as opposed to the popular status group (Verschueren & Marcoen). The study also found that nonaggressive rejected children’s relationship with their father was less secure than popular children. Within the study’s results, it was established that nonaggressive rejected children viewed themselves as less worthy and less competent than the popular status group (Verschueren & Marcoen). Another study indicated that peer acceptance was a significant moderator of the effect of security of attachment and self-esteem (Gatino, Pinto, Santos, Vaughn, & Verissimo). In summary, children who have more secure attachment have more success in peer relationships because of high self-esteem

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