Job Redesign For Expanded HIM Functions By Elizabeth Layman

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Elizabeth Layman wrote a paper in 2011 titled “Job Redesign for Expanded HIM Functions”. In her paper she applied the principles of goal setting. Specifically, work redesign and job redesign follow reengineering and restructuring so that employee goals remain related to company mission. In some instances of Sector Changes such as preparation and implementation of Classification systems, readying for Standards Committees and federal reimbursement systems, the goals are defined by such preparation, implementation and readying and deviate from the day to day routine work. Much of the daily, routine work of HIS department staff is not specifically goal oriented and instead is more reactionary. For examples, there is no specific goal put on the …show more content…
To increase the level of skill, job variety can be introduced. Since specialization means that workers are performing in their best capacity, variety means they will be challenged with tasks requiring skills they may not be the strongest at. With this approach, management must ensure they pay attention to any licensing and credentialing requirements and that pay grades do not become an issue. To increase responsibility, work processes can be reorganized so that rewards and consequences are more closely tied to individual employee performance. While this sounds simple in theory, management should first ensure it has determined and qualified work product standards and then it must ensure that the right supervisory structure and personnel are in place to provide sufficient and meaningful supervision of employees and work products. Without such, employees may lose morale if rewards are not awarded fairly and poor performance is not dealt with. To increase accountability tasks and …show more content…
However, based on what is understood about the way current departments operate, some changes can be predicted with some certainty. Tasks will inevitably be added to the Department. The addition of tasks will add variety for some staff members which may increase motivation as result-oriented employees seek to complete the new tasks with renewed vigor. Since the addition of tasks may not always be intentional or desired, such as when regulations mandate new tasks, motivation could also decrease if the tasks create overload or if pay is not adjusted appropriately. As the Department is restructured to meet the new demands, roles will change. Supervisors will be given new tasks that require higher levels of skill and increased responsibility while employees may be given more accountability for their own work. As supervisors’ work changes, there will likely be changes to whom and how supervisors supervise. With these changes, communication of employees amongst themselves will likely increase as they collaborate amongst themselves to fulfill the new responsibilities. Decisions may take more time since supervisors have more responsibilities to tend to or decisions could take less time if employees are given more responsibility and accountability for their own tasks. Monitoring the results of the changes will

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