Job Market Or Marriage Market Summary

Improved Essays
The article “Job Market or Marriage Market?” was published by the History of Education Society on May 2007. The article can be found in the History of Education Quarterly’s 47th volume in the second issue. Joan Marie Johnson, author of Job Market or Marriage Market?, got her bachelor’s degree from Duke University and Ph.D. in the University of California Los Angeles. She is currently the Associate Provost’s Program Coordinator in the Northwestern University . Prior to this, she was the instructor of various History courses, including Women in American History, Problems In history: Gender, Race, and Sexuality in American History, in the Northeastern University of Illinois . These courses give insight to what are Johnson’s expertise is. Her specialization …show more content…
The article argues that exposure to a rigorous academic curriculum and extracurricular activities allowed women to gain the essential abilities to organize and advocate social reforms such as women’s suffrage. She was also able to demonstrate that these were influenced women through analyzes of letters to and from Southern women in Northern colleges. Through evaluation of the letters Johnson found that Southern women who attended Northern colleges married later in life due to the independence they gained through the exposure to influential professors, extracurricular activities and academic training. Attending college led many Southern women desiring the participation in social form and volunteer work in order to use their academic training and allowed them to feeling of accomplishment without …show more content…
After the argument is made the article proceeds to explaining why women were being educated, and then how education affected aspects of gender performance. There are three subsections: Why college? Why college in the North?, Marriage, and Paid versus Unpaid Work. In the subsection Why college? Why college in the North?, Johnson explains the reason why women from the South wanted education was to obtain self improvement. Those who chose to attend Northern colleges wanted to experience a greater sense of independence. In the Marriage section, she states that marriage rates were lower in educated women and proceeds to explain the factors that could have led to it. One was that educated women from the South preferred Southern gentlemen to the businesslike northerner. Southern men might have been intimidated by the intellectual women. This led to a shortage of suitors. On the other hand, educated women feared that marriage would take way the independence they had gained, therefore, their new found happiness. In Paid versus Unpaid work, Johnson describes how Southern women rejected the notion of joining the work force, although some did become teachers, and instead focused on volunteer work and social reform. This unpaid work allowed women to have a sense of accomplishment. It also explains that the

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    Rich makes this argument to say that women do not have the same, fair chance as men would because they are not getting more than a man’s perspective. The education they receive is what the men believe is important for them to learn or not to learn. This argument is slightly biased due to Rich’s feminist ideals and political views, however the statement is fairly true. Personally, I agree with Rich’s statement because I,too, am a feminist, however I can recognize that she lets her bias play into her portrayal of her…

    • 1294 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Antebellum Gender Equality

    • 1583 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Greenville Woman’s College, for example, had to pay off debts by auctioning land, alongside their decline in enrollment. To fix that problem, President Charles Judson hired his sister Mary Camilla Judson as a teacher. Her presence at the college made an impact in the students and led to an increase in admission as she became a female leader in the community (Daniel). Among the ascending prosperity in education, women still faced intolerance from men. Male doctors wrote about women’s education and the inferiority of the idea; they often noted that education ravages a woman’s physical health, or the pure idea was impossible (“Early College Women: Determined to be Educated.”).…

    • 1583 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    In the years before the Civil War, the lives of American women were shaped by a set of ideals of something called True Womanhood. Women were perceived to be perfect and were forced to follow religion and be within the four characteristics of virtue that defined women (piety, purity, domesticity, and submissiveness) and not to step out of those boundaries. However, that all changed when their husbands, brothers, sons, and more were sent off to go to war. During the Civil War, American women turned their attention to the world outside the home and many played many different and important parts. Women’s contributions are probably more widely thought of on the battlefield.…

    • 2164 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Gays During Ww2

    • 1407 Words
    • 6 Pages

    This also shifted working roles of women away from family-oriented like nursing was, to being more individualistic. These jobs provided better salaries for women as well. The author describes that women working as teachers in the Southern States were attracted to certain positions. “The WAVES, which more markedly than the WAC tended to recruit from the middle- class group, drew heavily from the teaching profession, especially in the Southern States where salaries were notably low.” (Nottingham 673) The article was written just after World War 2, and makes some prognostications about the…

    • 1407 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The rise of the career woman should give thanks to the feminist of the 1960s and 1970s who fought for equality inside and outside the home. The women’s movement was able to changes women’s roles, identities and sense of self. Friedan also promoted higher education and a pursuit of work outside the home as the ultimate way American women could avoid feeling tapped in the ideal housewife image which she coined as the feminine mystique. Women where ultimately given many opportunities men enjoyed, including education, the right to pursue their own careers, and, most important, the right to vote. Women wanted to get back to work and establish a sense of personal…

    • 1150 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Mona Lisa Smile Analysis

    • 1861 Words
    • 8 Pages

    Feminism became a movement because women came together and decided they wanted to be treated differently and that they wanted to fill the void of the problem that had no name. Across the nation, college campuses are beginning to welcome thoughts of women’s rights and understand the true nature and worth of women in higher education. As social workers, becoming involved in campus wide education is essential to diminishing ideas of traditional gender roles and even the idea of gender related careers paths. In recent years, women’s centers, majors in women’s studies and feminism, and clubs and groups have formed in order to educate individuals about women’s rights and issues. By furthering the efforts of these organizations within institutes of higher education, social workers can stand from a larger platform to educate and empower young women about their true potential, regardless of what traditional society and gender roles expects from them.…

    • 1861 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    NOW argued that is was necessary for political, economic and social change to come to the American lifestyle to ensure that women were seen as complete equals to men instead of being seen as inferior. NOW argued that women should have the opportunity to pursue higher education and a successful career that brought them happiness and should not be forced to play a certain role out of obligation. The document was written in 1966 shortly after the Civil Rights Movement occurred and the main contributor was Betty Friedan. Friedan wrote the document because even though there were laws entrenched in the Civil Rights Act that prohibited discrimination based on sex, society had not responded in favour of the act. Friedan wrote that, “many employers did not grant women training, job promotion and equal pay for equal work.” Many employers continued to overlook a women’s potential because of her sex and this resulted in fewer workingwomen, discrimination in the workplace and a significant wage difference between men and…

    • 1869 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Women Waking Neighbors

    • 841 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Women Waking Neighbors Up The late 1700s were a time of social progress and reform for women. Women were confined to the domestic sphere and were only given education to pass on to their sons while their daughters were taught domestic necessities. Some women wrote to express their challenges to the patriarchal society and spread more progressive ideals. Judith Sargent Murray and Elizabeth Cady Stanton were two such authors. Murray’s work “On the Equality of Sexes” and Stanton’s works Eighty Years and More: Reminiscences, and the “Declaration of Sentiments” fought for women’s education and against preconceived notions about their place in society.…

    • 841 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Strengths Of Feminism

    • 2079 Words
    • 8 Pages

    These female head teachers can be positive role models to the female pupils; showing them to strive for their goals instead of growing up and becoming a housewife. Girls and young women are changing their ambitions due to the feminist movement. Sue Sharpe (1976) conducted a study and researched the attitudes of girls towards their ambitions in London schools. In 1976, the results of her content analysis showed that the girls were focused on marriage and motherhood once they had finished school. One female pupil stated that ‘I think men should [have careers].…

    • 2079 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Most people felt that women did not have the need to be educated like the men and boys were. Some people believed that if women had the opportunity to be well educated it would ruin the marriage and eventually harm their mind. Normally, only daughters of the wealthy could receive and…

    • 1894 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays