Jenny Coleman Feminist Analysis

1466 Words 6 Pages
What is the true meaning of Feminism? Because generations of women have acquired different perceptions of feminism over time, the ideological values and beliefs held by this public are not observed on the same standards as they once were. Professors, politicians, homosexuals, conservatives, and large institutions such as the Catholic Church are a few of the small groups that classify feminism in their own individual terms. Since feminism has critically transformed in recent years, the way in which it can be interpreted has been an essential target of debate. Right before the emergence of third wave feminism, second wave feminism spearheaded a radical liberation movement in the 1970s. Well-known authors like Betty Friedan played a key role …show more content…
Coleman views the waves of feminism as metaphors that illustrate how feminist movements have experienced “accomplishments and defeats” (Coleman 5). Although all waves are linked together, Coleman believes this is problematic because third wave feminism contains proponents that “break away” from the agendas and ideologies of second wave feminism (5). For example, members of this public significantly differ from one another by each generation. According to Christine Dann, author of the Women’s Liberation Movement, second wave feminists consisted of groups of people who advocated vigorously for women’s rights (qtd. in Coleman 5). Third wave feminists now involve young women who are “power-feminists” and have developed “a new style of sassy, in-your-face” feministic points of view (qtd. in Coleman …show more content…
Pope Benedict XVI states “the basis of a collaborative relationship is the recognition of the complementary gifts and skills of men and women. Women in particular should not aim to emulate the strengths of men but should instead nurture their own distinct gifts” (qtd. in Kaveny 16). Evidently, Pope Benedict XVI discusses how men and women play distinctive roles in life that should not be meant to compete with each other, and Kaveny suggests that this relationship is most clearly seen through marriage (16). Feminists agree that women and men both “bring important gifts to human society” (Kaveny 16). However, the reason why most feminists worry about this idea is because the way it comes into practice demonstrates “separation and practical inequality” (Kaveny 16). Although complementarity functions in marriage, it does not answer to the same skills and ambitions that both men and women have in common (Kaveny 16). Kaveny then considers that shared gifts and desires are not a form of competition but a form of “friendship” (16). After observing each stakeholder’s perspective of feminism, it was clear that each defined it differently based on their own set of theories and belief systems. It is important to consider that with all of these individual standpoints, feminism continues to take on separate forms. The bigger picture here is the status of women. In the end, women are essentially fighting for the

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