Japanese Nursing Home Case Study

961 Words 4 Pages
In Tokyo, Japan many of the nursing homes primary owners are the land owners themselves and some time in many cases the nursing homes facilities run as the family business of few generations. As we know that the Japanese nursing homes patients only pays 10 percent of the taxes out of their pocket for the services they are getting in the nursing homes and since prices are fixed by government, so nursing homes cannot raise the price as they want or even in loss the nursing homes cannot close down the facility without the government permission. For staying afloat, nursing homes are basically in many cases cut down their nurse support system to a minimum number. In Japan family members were responsible for taking care of their elderlies till 2000, …show more content…
The country will need 2.5 million caregivers by 2025 and its health ministry forecasts that it will be short of 300,000 workers by then. And beside the above mentioned nursing home care was long term care facilities. In short term care facilities, Japan already were facing situation of shortages of care workers. By 2060, about 40 percent of the population will be above the age of 65 years and about 520,000 Japanese seniors are on waiting lists for placements in nursing homes. Almost half of state-funded nursing homes in Tokyo were short of workers and not to mention nine percent of the 305 care facilities cancelled their activities for the elderly, while others are refusing to admit the elderly patients for further treatments in their …show more content…
Kunio Michino, Director of Doaikai Hospital, said: "Elderly people tend to forget when they take oral medicine, and in many cases the administrator is not always standing by to manage the dosage. If I want to prescribe oral medicine for aged person, some cases may occur that the person does not take the medicine properly. This is what I always concern about the elderly person when I ask to take oral medicine regularly, because many of old people develops dementia as well." Patch medicine, such as plasters has been developed by Hisamitsu Pharmaceutical since it first entering the pharmaceutical industry in 1847. Hisamitsu has been providing medicinal products, particularly pain relieving patches and has grown into Japan's leading company in the world of drugs for external use. The company is developing patch medicine with many improvements such as all directional stretch materials with skin. Hisamitsu is looking forward to market patch medicines

Related Documents