Changes During The Japanese Colonial Period

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Within the world history, the colonization of Japan ruling Korea only lasted for 35 years. During the colonial period, Japanese imperialism in Korea had a significant ambivalent impact towards many Koreans. This essay will compare and contrast the differences between the first ten and second ten years of Japanese colonial policy in Korea. This is because Korea experiences dramatically changes in their cultural, political and economic policy under the Japanese rules. The essay will then distinguish why Japan changed its policies during the colonial period and how the changes in these two decades were effective.
During the Meiji period, Japan has taken a huge leap into westernizing the country. The leap of Japan’s extensive westernization had outstandingly form an uprising position along with the Western power, establishing a stronger industrial world power. This transformation gave Japan a new global sense to render the ripe for colonization (Dudden, 2006). During the Meiji Restoration period, Japan always had plans to control Korea as a part of expanding the colonial empire. However, Korea was formerly seized in the eyes of the three dominant countries such as China, Russia, and Japan as a colony. In 1894-95, the
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From the first decade to the second decade, the effectiveness of the two policies was highly neutral. The effectiveness was not an efficient uprising drift, as subsequently Korea was still under Japanese colonial. However, the changes from the two decades did slightly benefit a stronger pathway to the Korean independence as Korea was able to be recognized among the international politics. The changing policies converted an effective catalyst towards establishment more liberty. Regardless of the political and cultural issues in the second decade, it positively softened and reinforces less violent and

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