Jane Austen Pride And Prejudice Analysis

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There are a few important themes which are treated again and again in the novels of Jane Austen, though in each case the novelist is able to impart something of freshness and novelty to the treatment. The business of getting people engaged and married is one of the important themes which the novelist takes up for the treatment in novel after novel. Jane Austen, sharing the opinion commonly held by her contemporaries and satisfied with the conditions that prevailed, was of the view that a young women should marry for love certainly, but in satisfactory conditions. Austen gives object lesson to show how careful a young woman should be in marrying well, by describing the misconditions.
Key Words: Love, Marriage, Pride, Prejudice, Mannerism.
Introduction
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The novel makes it clear that Darcy’s pride leads to prejudice and Elizabeth's prejudice stems from a pride in her own perception. Elizabeth does not give Darcy a chance or rather she does to give a chance to know how she really feel about him. The famous first encounter is disastrous: it occurs at the assembly were Darcy says Bingley of Elizabeth, who is sitting down: “she is tolerable but not handsome enough to tempt me: and I am in no humor at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men.” As a natural result Elizabeth remained with no very cordial feeling towards …show more content…
Mrs.Bennet gets what she deserves, Mr. Collins chooses a companion unlike himself, while Jane and Elizabeth select persons agreeable and suitable to their temperament and personality. Jane and Bingley both are of good nature and so deserve to be each other partners. Elizabeth and Darcy form another pair of lovers whose nature is more or less similar.
These two characters are remarkably intelligent and both are given to critically examining men and manners. Elizabeth becomes unduly prejudiced against Darcy, because of his pride and partly because of the false presentation of his character by Wickham. But as the story progresses Elizabeth’s prejudice against Darcy and Darcy’s pride Elizabeth are removed and eventually they are married. In this case again Jane Austen approves of the marriage of good personality and temperaments.
In the words of Jane Austen heart must be controlled by head, feelings must be subordinated to reason. She is angry with a character who is led away by the feelings. However Austen does not despise that Elizabeth is fascinated by the sweet manners and charming personality of Wickham. But on the sound advice of her Aunt Mrs. Gardiner, she controls her feelings. Lydia has neither sense nor character to put check on her feelings. She elopes with Wickham at the first opportunity and brings disgrace to herself and on her

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