James Bain Case Study

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The case that I chose from the database was the James Bain case. James Bain was an exonerate and he served 35 years in prison from 1974 to 2009. He was falsely accused from eyewitnesses, but what shocked me was the amount of time to find out that he was actually innocent. I chose this case because, even when forensic evidence of his blood showed that he wasn’t the criminal, he was still accused and was sent to prison because of it. His prison sentence was 25 to life, and if it wasn’t for his case re-opening, he would have spent the rest of his life in jail for a crime that he never committed. Even though that James was set free, he had to endure 35 years in prison for a false accusation and to make matters worse is that the actual perpetrator has not been caught yet. On March of 1974, a young boy was dragged from his house in Lake Wales, Florida and was raped out at a baseball field. The victim and his uncle gave a broad description of the person who committed the crime. They stated that the person looked as if …show more content…
After reading the case, I don’t agree on that main reason on James’ wrongful conviction. The details that were given from the victim were way too broad to conclude that James was the perpetrator. There had to be other details that were given to conclude that James was the one. If that was the sole reason that James was convicted then the investigators should be ashamed of ending the case so short of notice. Also, the DNA of the stain did not match James, and the blood test showed that the actual perpetrator only had an A blood type. Even if James could not have been dismissed, they should have dug deeper into the case to make sure that they weren’t convicting the wrong person. Because of that, James has to live with the notion of being wrongly accused and living in prison for 35

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