Jacques-Louis David: Napoleon's Death Of Marat

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The French Revolution was a time of reckoning, blood shed, clashing beliefs, and chaos. With the French people overthrowing the Monarchy and execution of French aristocracy including King Louis XVI and his wife Marie Antoinette. This time period is such mixture for the arts. With the flamboyant and dream like Rococo style representing all the luxury that Royalty where having while leaving the French people to starve, artists started looking for new styles to lead the way of the Revolution. Jacques-Louis David was one of these artists and his work not only captured France but also the eye of Napoleon Bonaparte, who would rule France as emperor after the French Revolution. A strong proponent for French rights would latter go on to become Napoleons …show more content…
In the image you see Marat leaning slumped over the side of his bath, still holding the piece of work that allowed Charlotte in to do her terrible deed. It is painted in true Neo-classical form with emphasize on the ideal instead of the natural. There is no sign of the horriable skin condition that would cause someone to spend the majority of their time in water, and there is no blood and gore to magnify the horror of the incident. This is where Goya and David differ greatly amongst their works. Where David reaches for ancient Greek and tries to undermine the Aristocracy’s Rococo style by bringing back classical painting; Goya sees more into the present and the modern style. Creating an image that would resonate with the …show more content…
While David went on to paint for Bonparte and created image after image crafting his ruler in the most favorable of lights. Goya’s experience with the leader had a different effect on his work. After the war and up until later on in his life Goya made prints of things that he saw during the French’s invasion of Spain. The series entitled the Disasters of War is a make-up of 82 prints depicting acts such as torture, rape, decapitation, dismemberment, and murder. These prints are made up of the sheer terror that came upon the Spanish people, and in the black and white images you see people being killed and tortured for sport. All of the images are unsettling and the only name Goya ever gave the collection was Fatal consequences of Spain’s bloody war with Bonaparte, and other emphatic caprices; He would just put a simple phrase at the bottom of each print. All are brutal and beautiful in their own right but the most terrible one is plate 38 titled heroic feat! With dead men. Susan Sontag says, “With Goya a new standard for responsiveness to suffering enters art ... While the image, like every image, is an invitation to look, the caption, more often than not, insists on the difficulty of doing just

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