Jacksonian Democracy Dbq Analysis

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Register to read the introduction… This party however ignored the sinfulness of slavery and saw slavery as a threat to republicanism and the Jeffersonian ideal of a freeholder society. Jacksonian Democrats on the other hand led efforts to restrict free northern blacks political and legal rights. “The Democrats appealed to the voters with racial slurs, portraying blacks as the subhuman enemies of white men’s equal rights and as allies of the crypto-aristocratic money power (couvares 218). Many of these Jacksonian Democrats saw a plantation as the only way for quarantining Africans. Some Jacksonian northerners thought that the abolitionist wanted to free the slaves and send them to the north where there presence would decrease the wages and status of white workingmen (221). Although the majority of Jacksonian leaders had racist views, a few took stands against slavery and the racism that went along with it (219). “It was the Democracy, the antislavery leader Preston King later remarked, that had “changed its members, its principles, its purposes, and its character”. Antislavery Jacksonians, by their own lights, had kept the faith (225). Many men believed this racism would never come to an end unless one race becomes extinct. On the notes of the state of Virginia a man states, “Deep rooted prejudices entertained by the whites, ten thousand recollections, by the blacks, of the injuries they have …show more content…
In a constant battle against and ever changing democracy, and opposing viewpoints, men and women took a stand against the nations flaws of slave holding, and its vast economic issues. Through several years of countless failed proposals and bloodshed, laws and freedoms were finally implemented, which helped to promote our economic success in years to …show more content…
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