Jackie Robinson's Influence On Desegregation

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Many people know, or have heard the name Jackie Robinson, but many don’t know who he really was. Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier, and desegregated the game of baseball. It’s important to know who he is because he not only made changes for equality on the field, but also off the field. To learn what kind of person he was, and his inspiration, we have to learn more about his life. In this essay you will learn about his early life, his career, his accomplishment, his hardships, and most importantly, his influence on desegregation.
To begin to learn about Jackie Robinson, you need to learn about what his life was like growing up. Jack Roosevelt Robinson was born on January 31, 1919, in Cairo, Georgia. Living in the early 20th century America, he definitely faced his hardships through racism. Especially in the 1920s, you had to deal major racist groups like the W.A.S.P.s (White Anglo Saxon Protestant), and the Ku Klux Klan. These groups were aimed towards getting rid of non white immigrants from entering the U.S., and also eliminating anyone they saw as a threat to America. Not only did he have to deal with racism, he also grew up in poverty to a single mother. He never had the greatest opportunities because his
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Jackie Robinson was drafted into the U.S. Army. This cut short his highly anticipating baseball career. He served as a second lieutenant, but never saw battle. After serving two years in the military, he was soon arrested and court martialed. While he was going through boot camp, he refused to give up his seat on the bus, and move to the back. His brave behavior shed light on the injustice he was served though various black newspapers, and the NAACP(National Association for the Advancement of Colored People). His charges were then dropped, and he was discharged. This showed how he was not afraid to stand up, and fight for what he thought was right, which would soon become hard for him to

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