Jackie Robinson Obstacles

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Most individuals around the world know Jackie Robinson by the man who broke the color barrier in the Major League Baseball (MLB) on April of 1947. They do not know everything he faced to get to that day. Jackie had to face more obstacles in his life to get to where he was when he broke the color barrier. Today’s society is much different as it was in the 1900’s era. Jackie Robinson helped change America as he played baseball through the Major Leagues while fighting racism and battling adversity. Today he is an iconic sports figure that is still remembered today. Most people know Robinson as the guy who broke the color barrier in 1947. What they do not know is who he was before. Robinson was a four sport athlete while attending University of …show more content…
Not only has the league retired his number “42”, they also have a day where every player and manager wears his number. April 15th of every year is known as Jackie Robinson Day. Robinson has won many awards. Such as the rookie of the year award in 1947, Most Valuable Player (MVP) in 1948, and was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962.
After Robinson retired from baseball in 1957, he continued to be involved in the civil rights movement. He often would take action in the voting registration, and often worked with Martin Luther King Jr. to accumulate money to help rebuild the churches for the African Americans in Georgia that was burnt (Bilyeu). During his tenure of playing in the MLB, Robinson deal with racism and was tired of it. He sought to make the MLB integrated, and make America not be segregated.
Robinson did not care that he was a black man. He thought of himself as a human being. Many gave Robinson the reason to give up and quit what he was doing. He never gave up because he was not that kind of man. He was not going to let others win the fight he was in. He not only wanted African Americans to have the same rights as whites, but he also would not give up until they had that right. As schools were now integrated, Robinson thought that black players should have full access to lobbies, bars and swimming pools of the hotels they stayed at (Jackie Robinson Part

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