Baseball Influence On Society

Improved Essays
Baseball is an all American sport that takes its pride in its patriotism. At one time American baseball was the number one sport to watch and follow in the United States. It was just as popular as American Football is today. It was considered a gentlemen’s game that held a high reputation for gamesmanship and sportsmanship. Baseball had a very powerful influence on society. During the 1940’s, baseball was majority played by white Americans. Thanks to Jackie Robinson, today baseball is one of the leading professional sports who employ minorities. Jackie Robinson was a professional athlete for the game of baseball, but what he came to understand was that he also had to play a totally different type game. A game that was more powerful …show more content…
During this time in America if you were an African American or Latin American you played in the Negro baseball league. In 1946, Jackie Robinson signed with the Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro Baseball League, his first professional baseball team. Baseball took off like a rocket ship, World War II had just ended and what better time to capitalize on the opportunity to change America’s temperament on a race of people who have long been viewed as inferior and not equal. That was Branch Rickey vision, the general manager and president of the Brooklyn Dodgers. Mr. Rickey knew this would require a person with flawless and impeccable character. A person who could with stand the verbal abuse and reticule to come in the near future. Of course there were other Negro baseball players just as good as Jackie Robinson, or even better. However, for this to work it would take a tremendous amount of will power on and off the field and that’s what made Jackie Robinson a special human being and a special ball …show more content…
Within the same year, Branch Rickey offered Jackie Robinson an invitation to join his minor league franchise the Montreal Royals. Segregation was the American way of living, it was in the military and in sports the Jim Crow way of living was the norm. However, changing the temperament of society was a very hard challenge. An Atlanta journalist Ed Danforth was quoted saying "I don 't see why a top-flight Negro ballplayer would be so anxious to play in the white leagues when he is doing so well in his own organization." Branch Rickey did his very best in aiding Jackie Robinson to break down the racial barrier on

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