Jack And Algernon In Oscar Wilde's Importance Of Being

Superior Essays
Jack and Algernon, two significant characters in Oscar Wilde’s Importance of Being Earnest, are characterized by similarities and differences that drive the main plot of the play. For example, both characters are well versed in the art of deception, because they have used fictional names and characters in their lives. The “Bunburying” causes the most comic aspect of the play: the mistaken identities. Although the two characters take parallel actions, such as when they developed imaginary characters to escape from tedious situations, they have different personalities and nurtured traits. Jack and Algernon are both part of the upper class, living comfortable lives. Jack, however, is an orphan adopted into the high society. This background partly …show more content…
If the two did not act similarly with a comparable social background, the misunderstandings between Gwendolen and Cecily would not have occurred. Therefore, the deception caused by the characters’ similarity causes a misunderstanding that only the audience is aware of, leading the complication of the plot. In this manner, Wilde satirizes Victorian society which has certain expectations people all follow. Since the similar actions evokes the comedic mood of the play, Wilde effectively makes fun of the uniformity of Victorian society and its …show more content…
Although Algernon and Jack both create fictional characters for their comfort, Algernon’s creation has a different purpose and sentiment behind it. Algernon creates an imaginary friend he could use as an excuse, while Jack acts as his imaginary brother. Algernon acts as though his “Bunburying” is something perhaps to revel; he strongly defends, “A man who marries without knowing Bunbury has a very tedious time of it.” (Wilde 11). He enjoys using “Bunbury,” thinking society needs such entertainment and relief. Because he is similar to Oscar Wilde in terms of dress and philosophy, the character, consequently the author, believes that deception is necessary and aesthetic pleasing. The character believes life is a work of art on its

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