Public Universities Vs Private Universities

1960 Words 8 Pages
John Adams, George W. Bush, George H.W. Bush, Gerald Ford, John F. Kennedy, Franklin D. Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, Rutherford B. Hayes, William Henry Harrison, John Quincy Adams, James Madison, Theodore Roosevelt, Bill Clinton, Woodrow Wilson, Barack Obama all have two things in common: being president of the United States and graduating from an Ivy League University (Westbrook). That makes 15 presidents who attended an Ivy League school. The Ivy League schools, most of which are older than the United States itself, have produced numerous successful and prestigious alumni since their opening; however, while the Ivy League colleges do provide prestigious degrees, they also provide colossal amounts of stress and anxiety (Torrez). Of the …show more content…
Public universities prioritize in building new buildings over giving out scholarships to their students; thus, the “sticker” price, or the price without any scholarships, is usually the price a public university student will pay, unlike in private universities which prioritize raising money and giving out scholarships over the construction of new buildings (Ekman). Public universities also have lower graduation rates compared to private universities, and this can be partially attributed to the enrollments being generally much larger than private universities causing the ratio of students-to-teachers to be higher compared to private universities; consequently, the students will have less interaction with the teachers. The size of public universities is also generally larger, making a student feel less important in the sea of other student. From a standpoint of a potential employer, a degree from a public university does not make a student stand-out compared to a student from an Ivy League school; in addition; public universities do not usually have the prestigious alumni and professors that an Ivy League school has (“Are Ivy League Colleges Worth the …show more content…
According to Dr. Mel Schiavellia, president of Harrisburg University of Science and Technology in Pennsylvania, “Yale does not have an accounting program that equals the [accounting program at the] University of Maryland.” So the salaries at some public universities will be similar to those at an Ivy League; in addition, most employers now favor a student`s work ethic, personality, and what they did in college over where he or she got his or her education (Koba). Ivy League schools do offer an outstanding education with many connections between employers, fellow graduates, and alumni; however, these all come at a price, and unless a student can receive grants and/or scholarships he or she will have tremendous amounts of debt to payoff, for the average cost to attend an Ivy League school is $56,000 a year (Koba). Eileen Torrez, a Harvard graduate, reminisces on her experience at the University: she countlessly reiterates that the stress of the coursework and the stress to prove why you got into the college is monumental. She writes about how she, along with others, at some point had broken down and stayed locked up his or her room. In addition to her story, she includes that the attempted suicide rates are twice as high at Harvard compared to the national rate, and 35% of Princeton students developed a mental health issue due to the

Related Documents