Isolation In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Great Essays
The Effect’s of Isolation in Frankenstein Throughout the novel, Frankenstein, Mary Shelley uses the situations of both Victor Frankenstein and the creature that he creates to highlight the devastating effects of solitude which are the ultimate causes of both character’s inhumane actions. Frankenstein’s struggle ,- es do not begin until he isolates himself from his family and in turn forget’s the values that he was raised on. He is also effected by the solitude that he imposes upon himself by keeping the secret of his creation. From the moment Frankenstein flees the scene of his creature’s “birth” the monster finds himself completely alone. Though he is innately goodhearted he is unable to relate to mankind due to his physical appearance. …show more content…
When Henry Clerval appears, Frankenstein says “I felt suddenly, and for the first time in many months calm and serene joy” (pg. 41.) This emphasizes the effects that the solitude of the past two years have had on Frankenstein. He has not felt the contentedness that he was privileged with during his youth for months. The grim obsession that lead to his isolation had never filled his need for human interaction. However, even with the timing of Clerval 's arrival he neglects to confide his secret in him which yet again leads to his isolation. After the murder of Frankenstein’s younger brother William at the hands of the creature, which later results in the death of his adopted sister, Frankenstein is overcome with guilt he, still fails to confide his secret in anyone. When Frankenstein’s father begins to notice the terrible impact the two deaths have had on his son he attempts to console him, but his attempts are in vain. “This advice although good, was totally inapplicable to my case” (pg. 70.) This quote shows the effects of the isolation that Frankenstein has brought upon himself by keeping his creation to himself. Because he no longer has anyone who can relate to his feelings he is thrown further into …show more content…
. After the creature preforms his first act of revenge by killing Frankenstein’s younger brother, Charlie, he says “I too can create desolation; my enemy is not impregnable; this death will carry despair to him, and a thousand other miseries shall torment and destroy him” (pg. 117.) By saying that desolation is created by the destruction of those close to someones heart, the creature is showing that isolation is the most heartbreaking situation to endure. Though the creature could have easily just killed Frankenstein, he had felt the effect’s of isolation on himself and knew it to be a fate worse than death. If the creature had never felt the depression of isolation he would have never felt the need to spread that sadness to

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    Frankenstein did not have remorse in the creation of the monster. He only regretted that he failed in making his being perfect. Frankenstein, had he succeeded in the task of killing the monster, would most likely try again. The monster, on the other hand, realized the horrible things he had done and planned to kill himself to make up for it. He recognized the faults in his morals and decided that he was too bad of a person to be saved.…

    • 892 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    The monster in Frankenstein represents the detrimental affects that the isolation of oneself can have. Being bullied for his looks, not having a strong support system of loved ones that care, and being rejected by everyone left him to become an anger-filled, revenge-seeking monster. Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, the two gunman that started the Columbine Massacre fit the above description almost too accurately. Has society not learned that the key to peace is…

    • 1491 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Frankenstein’s monster is just another victim to society’s standards. In the end, the creature regrets all of his actions. I believe his actions were not because he was evil, but because he was lonely and had no other way to express himself. When he asked nicely for a female companion, his own creator did not want to listen to him; therefore, he has to threaten Frankenstein. Evil is not present when one is born, or in this case created, but instead it manifests out of a circumstance or people.…

    • 1216 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Victor himself speaks of his horror upon seeing his creation when it was brought to life, “I beheld the wretch—the miserable monster whom I had created. He held up the curtain of the bed; and his eyes, if eyes they may be called, were fixed on me. His jaws opened, and he muttered some inarticulate sounds, while a grin wrinkled his cheeks” (Shelley, Frankenstein 44). The reader can see how he, and even those of a stronger disposition, would have fled. However, even this fear doesn’t excuse Victor’s breach of responsibility, being the one who brought this monster into the world he owed the monster some form of care, be it actual compassion and attention, or seeing that the monster was destroyed to end his suffering and preserve the lives of others.…

    • 1234 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    By abandoning the creature he brought to life, Frankenstein condemns the monster to a life of loneliness. Frankenstein is an example of a parent who does not think about how their actions effect the growth of their child. Every parent fears their child will cause them harm or sadness, but absolute neglect is the only way to guarantee that someone will not be able to succeed. The process of creation obsesses Frankenstein, just as conception can overly excite the average…

    • 1488 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    A unchangeable mistake was made when Victor Frankenstein created a monster in Mary Shelley’s, Frankenstein. The monster was abandoned at first sight by his creator. Knowing nothing of the outside world, he has to learn how to live on his own. He commits many evil deeds throughout the book. The monster was not accepted by society nor his creator.…

    • 1728 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Empathy In Frankenstein

    • 672 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Even though his family has been killed by the creature, Dr. Frankenstein only takes action against it after his last family member has been killed by it. He does so because he cannot rely on his family for emotional support, which shows that he is narcissistic, and cares more about himself than the welfare of other people. When the creature kills Dr. Frankenstein’s brother, his best friend Henry and his wife, Elizabeth, he is not motivated to take revenge because he has his father to rely on emotionally. However, after his father dies from hearing about the death of Elizabeth, he lost all his social connections so he was alone and miserable. Before the monster’s horrible acts, he could depend on his family when he was sick or depressed; but…

    • 672 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Instead, Frankenstein showed a disregard for human life as he did not act on the monsters actions when his brother died or Justine was executed for the crime he really caused. It is not until his best friend dies that Victor begins to attempt to stop his creation, but at that point it is already too late and his lovely wife Carolina suffers a painful death all because of her husband’s…

    • 1202 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Greed In Frankenstein

    • 1005 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Of course, this was in fact a scientific breakthrough which would most definitely get him the recognition and praise he desired, but because of how hideous his creation turned out to be, Frankenstein’s vanity pushed him to instead feel fear and embarrassment rather than accomplishment. These feelings served as a vehicle for his continued plight and, of course, indulgence of arrogance. Instead of taking responsibility of his creation as would a proper parent and perhaps more applicably, a god would, Frankenstein completely abandons him. In addition to this, he also chooses to continue to keep his monster a secret and never informs any of his peers, professors, closest friends, family, and even fiancée, ultimately endangering them all. When his closest and dearest friend, who, through “unbounded and unremitting actions … restored [him] to life” (66), asked if Frankenstein could answer…

    • 1005 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Also, the language used to describe the creature gives a prejudicial view that the creature is a monster. Finally, when Frankenstein reacted and then left suggests that he does not want to nurture an ugly beast and thus the creature grew up alone and isolated. The abandonment of the creature proves that Frankenstein is an incompetent father figure, which contributes to the creature’s development into a miserable life. Because of the ugly appearance of the creature, Frankenstein abandons his creation and disclaims all responsibility as a parent, leaving the creature to fend for himself in society. Similar to the creature being isolated from his creator, the creature was also isolated from society as he was growing up on his own and learning through experience, which leads him to live a miserable life.…

    • 1105 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays