Isolation In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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The Effect’s of Isolation in Frankenstein Throughout the novel, Frankenstein, Mary Shelley uses the situations of both Victor Frankenstein and the creature that he creates to highlight the devastating effects of solitude which are the ultimate causes of both character’s inhumane actions. Frankenstein’s struggle ,- es do not begin until he isolates himself from his family and in turn forget’s the values that he was raised on. He is also effected by the solitude that he imposes upon himself by keeping the secret of his creation. From the moment Frankenstein flees the scene of his creature’s “birth” the monster finds himself completely alone. Though he is innately goodhearted he is unable to relate to mankind due to his physical appearance. …show more content…
When Henry Clerval appears, Frankenstein says “I felt suddenly, and for the first time in many months calm and serene joy” (pg. 41.) This emphasizes the effects that the solitude of the past two years have had on Frankenstein. He has not felt the contentedness that he was privileged with during his youth for months. The grim obsession that lead to his isolation had never filled his need for human interaction. However, even with the timing of Clerval 's arrival he neglects to confide his secret in him which yet again leads to his isolation. After the murder of Frankenstein’s younger brother William at the hands of the creature, which later results in the death of his adopted sister, Frankenstein is overcome with guilt he, still fails to confide his secret in anyone. When Frankenstein’s father begins to notice the terrible impact the two deaths have had on his son he attempts to console him, but his attempts are in vain. “This advice although good, was totally inapplicable to my case” (pg. 70.) This quote shows the effects of the isolation that Frankenstein has brought upon himself by keeping his creation to himself. Because he no longer has anyone who can relate to his feelings he is thrown further into …show more content…
. After the creature preforms his first act of revenge by killing Frankenstein’s younger brother, Charlie, he says “I too can create desolation; my enemy is not impregnable; this death will carry despair to him, and a thousand other miseries shall torment and destroy him” (pg. 117.) By saying that desolation is created by the destruction of those close to someones heart, the creature is showing that isolation is the most heartbreaking situation to endure. Though the creature could have easily just killed Frankenstein, he had felt the effect’s of isolation on himself and knew it to be a fate worse than death. If the creature had never felt the depression of isolation he would have never felt the need to spread that sadness to

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