Irony In Socrates's Apology

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The irony lies in the fact that the title is ‘Apology’ however, Socrates isn’t apologizing, rather defending him self against what they’re charging him. The word apology derives from the Greek word apologia, meaning speaking in defense of a cause or of one's beliefs or actions. “As for me, I was almost carried away by them, they spoke so persuasively. And yet almost nothing they said is true”. (Plato, 26) Socrates is merely explaining that he did not intentionally corrupt the youth of Athens, and he offers many explanations as to why he is not at fault for their actions. “The first thing justice demands, then, men of Athens, is that I defend myself from the first false accusations made against me and from my accusers” (Plato, 27) In Socrates

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