American Immigrants In The 19th Century

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In the nineteenth century, America experienced an abundance of Immigrants from Europe, causing anger, hatred, and discrimination throughout the nation. Ireland’s main food source for the poor and main income for farmers was damaged as the potato crop failure hit in 1845. The failure of the crops due to disease left the poor starving and farmers with little to no income due to the fact that they could not produce goods. Between 500,000 and one million people died from starvation. Irish left Ireland toward England, but England shipped them over to Canada as they did not want the immigrants. Many immigrants once landed in Canada, migrated to America in search for economic opportunities and freedom. The immigrants to enter the country were the …show more content…
Including signs stating “No Irish Need Apply” and “Protestants Only,” Irish were surrounded by hatred. Emigrating to America in search of new opportunities and occupations due to the Great Famine that caused death and poverty, the Irish had a hard time finding place in their new land. Religion allowed for the immigrants to gain a community, yet they still received some of the worst discrimination through religion. Religion found its way into politics and made it hard for Irish to find a place in politics, without being attacked by the Know-Nothings. Eventually, even policymakers took a stance on the immigration status, creating new acts and laws to restrict the allowance of immigrants into the country. Overall, Irish immigrants had a hard time settling in this new land, as they were seen as dirty criminals that filled jails, poor, unintelligent low class people that had not contribution to society, and religiously, they were demonized. Finding a place to fit in proved to be a challenge as America did not respond well to all the new people in their country. This response from Americans benefitted merely the high class citizens in the United States, had the strict policies not been put in place, the economy could have seen a boom supply and demand wise. Now, Americanized and accepted, Irish have a good place in the community and are far more welcomed than in the nineteenth

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