Ethnographic Approach In Psychology

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Psychology researchers used variety of methods to produce valid and reliable studies about human behaviour. Deriving from the second, sixth and seventh chapters of Investigating Psychology, this essay will discuss about the different approaches to studying the effect of obedience on people behaviour, children social actions and friendships, and how neuropsychology studied the way the brain work and control the cognitive process of language, using the technologically advanced methods or not using them.

An important approach is the classic experiment, which was used to explore many psychological fields by studying the effect of manipulating some variables on another. One example is the obedience study by Stanley Milgram, (Banyard, 2012, page
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One example is Bigelow and La Gaipa study. They used a questionnaire and collected data from written essays. Then, they converted these essays into numbers and quantitative data by coding the qualitative data they had. Yet, young children miss the skills required for writing these essays and this was a challenge that researchers needed to overcome in order to properly analyse the special and individual experiences of children. So regarding children friendship specifically and using the ethnographic approach (Brownlow, 2012, p 250), William Corsaro made detailed information by observing children groups from inside for long periods of time, and taking very precise notes in addition to video recording. Another example of using the technology of recording to study children is the study of Carly Butler about children’s interaction in the playground. She collected audio recordings of children’s interaction, then wrote them down and subjected them to a detailed analysis. She also used unmotivated looking to observe children’s social actions and how they organise their play and activities. She started from the conversations and social activities that she found rather than starting her study from the research question in order to obtain precise and detailed information, (The Open University, 2015). Researchers and psychologists understanding of friendship has changed, after the technological advancement in the ways people connect with each other’s. (Brownlow, 2012, page 266), the geographical closeness is not anymore required for this connection, with the invention of the internet and mobile phones. Raacke and Bonds-Raacke’s study showed that social networking online is very much in use for keeping in touch with

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