Muybridge: The Golden Age Of Hollywood

Improved Essays
Eric Hagadorn
3/15/2016
Dr. Ruth Martin
U.S. History and Literature

Inventor Britisher Eadweard Muybridge, an early photographer, was famous for his photographic studies of animals and people at the end of the 19th century. In June, 1878, he successfully conducted an experiment in California using a multiple series of cameras to record the horse galloping. The Horse in Motion was the first motion picture, using only 12 frames.

Muybridge 's pictures, published widely in the late 1800s, were often cut into strips and used in a Praxinoscope, invented by Charles Emile Reynaud in 1877. The Praxinoscope was the first projector that could put a series of images onto a screen. Muybridge 's stop-action series of photographs helped lead to his
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The 30s the decade that brought sound and color revolutions and the advance of the "Talkies", and the further development of film genres. It was the decade in which the silent period ended, with many silent film stars not making the transition to sound. By 1933, the economic effects of the Depression were being strongly felt, especially in decreased movie theatre attendance. Although the movie industry considered itself Depression-proof, the film industry was just as vulnerable to the Depression’s impact as any other industry. To finance the construction of movie theaters and the conversion to sound, the studios had nearly tripled their debts during the 1920s to $410 million. By 1933, movie attendance and industry revenues had decreased by 40 percent. To survive, the industry trimmed salaries and production costs, and closed the doors of a third of the nation’s theaters. To boost attendance, theaters resorted to such gimmicks as lower admission prices, double bills and …show more content…
Film makers introduced new ideas such as sound recording, special effects, color use, and lighting, that made movies more enjoyable to watch and much more popular. Horror films used techniques such as fog and stop motion to capture their audience and pull them into the terror. In order for the film producers to do stop motion, the actor would have to sit still for hours, while the makeup was gradually applied. Early 1940 's horror films used the effect of what you don 't see is scarier than what you do see, to make their audience more afraid. In addition, as they did in noir films, dim lighting and thematic scenes were used in many 1940 's films to scare the audience. the theaters reached their all-time highest attendance record, proving that the film industry was making big strides. Styles such as Noir films, war films, and animations grew in

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