Intrinsic Case Studies: Case Study: Pros And Cons?

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The case study method often describes an extensive investigation of one person (or a particular group of people), with the “hope of revealing universal principles” (Myers, D. (2010). Psychology (9th Edition), United States of America: Worth Publishers). They often adopt an idiographic approach, which is defined as “relating to the study or discovery of particular scientific facts and processes” (Oxford Dictionary). These clinical and developmental studies are undertaken over a fixed period of time, and result in the development of norms and/or generalisations about a specific population of people. There are two distinct types of case study research. These include intrinsic and instrumental case studies. Intrinsic case studies are aimed at discovering …show more content…
Case studies often prompt new research through the discovery of extraordinary behaviour. They may also challenge the expected result of the study, and can give new insight into different phenomena. Although the advantages are very valuable, case studies can cause a number of moral and ethical dilemmas. Ann Searle, for example, identified that one of the limitations of case studies is that they “cannot be replicated so it is not possible to check the reliability of the results” (Searle, A. (1999). Introducing Research and Data in Psychology, London, United Kingdom: Rutledge Publications). Searle also found that the “researcher may be subjective about what appears in the final report”, and, prior to undertaking the study, may show a certain bias towards a particular …show more content…
According to David Myers, a professor of psychology, naturalistic observation is defined as “observing and recording behaviour in naturally occurring situations without trying to manipulate and/or control the situation” (Myers, D. (2010). Psychology (9th Edition), United States of America: Worth Publishers). It’s role is not to explain behaviour, but to simply observe it happening in the real, or natural world. As such, there are no definable variables. Naturalistic observation does not aim to “directly bridge the gap between field and laboratory, but rather focuses upon what occurs in the field” (Miller, D.B. (1977). Roles of Naturalistic Observation in Comparative Psychology. American Psychologist, March 1977,

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