Into The Wild Chris Mccaandless Transcendentalism

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Throughout the riveting true story, Into The Wild, Chris McCandless repeatedly demonstrated intense physical and mental characteristics that a majority of Native American Indians had naturally acquired through personal experience. The author, Jon Krakauer, remarkably illustrates many of the harsh realities the Inuit people endured while living through the erratic Alaskan seasons, while contrasting McCandless’ similar experiences that resulted in a fatal tragedy. Although Krakauer is not necessarily considered a transcendentalist himself, the main character in his book resembled many aspects of the transcendental belief systems which were essentially established solely based on three concepts: self-reliance, non-conformity, and respecting the …show more content…
Modern transcendentalists commonly shared the same insight while connecting one’s spirit to the beauty of nature (Modern Day Transcendentalists). Chris McCandless, much like the Inuit people, set out in the desolate Alaskan territory “to explore the inner country of his own soul” in order to ultimately reach a healthy mind and body while enduring the harsh environments (Krakauer, 183). In the process of disconnecting himself to society, Krakauer describes Chris’s actions towards non-conformity when he tells about the burning of his remaining cash, “One hundred and twenty-three dollars in legal tender was promptly reduced to ash and smoke” (Krakauer, 29). The act of burning the remaining money was symbolic in breaking the final ties McCandless felt with society and his previous life. In a letter to his close friend Wayne, Chris describes the thrill of living on the edge and the benefit to an empty wallet, “Tramping is too easy with all this money. My days were more exciting when I was penniless” (Krakauer, 33). Chris’ unique views on money separate him from the rest of society and illustrate his participation in non-conformity. Both the Inuit and McCandless exhibited essential Transcendentalist ideology that focused on the importance of valuing nature and the openness it presented them …show more content…
The three main components of this modernistic ideology aided them to continue along their treacherous endeavors with the essential mindset required for survival. However, it was all too late for McCandless himself as he began to realize more inner truths and saw a simplistic future for himself in society sitting all alone in Fairbanks bus 142. McCandless shared a copious amount of similar beliefs as the Inuit people towards the end of his journey when he truly understood the value of human interactions. While being completely encompassed within the beauty of nature, Chris McCandless’ death could not have been a more symbolic tribute to his transcendentalist ideas he glorified to such a high

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