Intersectionality In Mental Health

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experiences of inequity makes individuals feel (Siegrist & Marmont, 2004). In contrast, intersectionality has been used in research to reflect the intersection of the social determinants of health, gender and class as affecting mental health outcomes (McGibbon & McPherson, 2012). The two explanatory approaches have different origins and methods of assessing relationships between social location and mental health outcomes. The psychosocial explanatory approach developed from sociological and psychological paradigms of social processes (McCloud, 2004). It is viewed as a framework to explain individualistic experiences of day-to-day existence (Siegrist, 2009). The intersectionality approach came out of feminist, post-colonial, and queer theories …show more content…
Bowleg (2012) in her research acknowledges three core tenets. The first core tenet, she states that social identities are multiple and intersecting (Bowleg, 2012). These social identities are the social locations of race, gender, sexual orientation, class that are interdependent and intersect with discrimination, disparity, and health inequity (Bowleg, 2012). Second, includes starting any inquiry with those marginalized and oppressed groups of people that in addition, may have multiple intersecting identities (Bowleg, 2012). The intersectionality approach then recognises the health outcomes within the groups’ own context rather than divergent from the dominant group (Bowleg, 2012). The final core tenet is that it realizes multiple social locations at an individual level intersect with the social structural levels, such as, poverty, sexism, discrimination, and stigma that cause social and health inequities (Bowleg, 2012). Olena Hankivsky, another researcher on intersectionality, adds another important core tenant. She stresses that we must remember that the social identities of race, gender, class, and sexuality are socially constructed (Hankivsky, 2012). These core tenets of the …show more content…
It also recognizes that one’s social identity is an outcome of intersecting factors of class, gender, socio-historical, and political processes (van Mens-Verhulst, & Radtke, 2008). The challenges of the intersectionality approach include that all inquiries must determine which social identities one should include (Bowleg, 2012). Another challenge that researchers must cope with when undertaking intersectionality, is that there are no clear guidelines to follow. (Bowleg, 2012; Hankivsky, 2012; McCall, 2005). These challenges cause the lack of operationalization and research done through the lens of intersectionality in public health (Bowleg, 2012). Intersectionality is an important explanatory approach underrepresented in the

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