Interpersonal Communication Theories

1696 Words 7 Pages
There are a myriad of theories and constructs that exist within the communication discipline that can ensure interpersonal relationships will thrive. However, there are five theories in particular that have proven invaluable in today’s world. With the advancement of technology and the accessibility of said technology, it is more pertinent than ever that people be versed in how to communicate with people they have interpersonal relationships with not only in face-to-face contexts, but online as well. Social media has made it easier than ever to meet people and take the first steps towards creating a relationship. Five theories that have proven most useful when it comes to navigating interpersonal relationships, especially in today’s technology …show more content…
This theory most often draws a correlation between disclosing information and the concealment of information thereafter. This can cause problems concerning boundary coordination if both parties, the discloser and the receiver, do not have clear boundaries set. Boundary coordination is the setting of boundaries in order to maintain control over the information and present a unified image to those outside of the boundary. Conflict arises if boundaries are not clearly drawn about the dissemination of private information and an outside party gains access to the information. This is called boundary turbulence. (Petronio & Durham, …show more content…
The theory states that we adapt our interaction behaviors to match or complement those we are communicating with. Reciprocity is a main part of interaction adaptation theory because humans often reciprocate the behaviors done to them. For instance, if someone were to be polite it would most likely be reciprocated by the person they were polite to. People enter conversations with predetermined expectations and desires (Floyd & Burgoon, 1999). If the conversation fails to go as they expected, it is referred to as expectancy violation and can either result in negative or positive emotional responses to the violation (Le Poire & Yoshimura,

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