Integrative Solution-Oriented Social Work Approach

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The four practice frameworks that are used to develop the integrative Solution- Oriented Social Work approach are the strengths perspective, solution-focused therapy, narrative therapy, and the MRI approach (Greene & Lee, 2011). The first framework is known as the Strengths Perspective. The main point behind this perspective is that the clients already have the different skills and resources necessary to be able to handle their problems in a successful manner, but they are either not aware that they are using them, not using them enough, or not using them at all (Greene & Lee, 2011). The goal of this perspective is to move away from just focusing on the on the problem and to use the clients strengths to help them figure out solutions to their …show more content…
From the name of this perspective, it is easy to see that the whole focus is to look at the strengths a client already has. The belief that clients already have strengths and resources in order to attain and achieve their goals is also the central idea in the solution-focused therapy, narrative therapy, and the MRI approach (Greene & Lee, 2011). By having the three other practice frameworks build on that of the strengths perspective, all four perspectives are then combined to be what as known as solution-oriented social work practice (Greene & Lee, 2011).
The second practice framework that helps to make up solution-oriented social work practice is known as Solution-Focused Therapy. Just like in the strengths perspective,
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This therapy is important because of the fact that the way people make sense of the world around them is by talking about different experiences (Greene & Lee, 2011). The more a person tells their story, the more it will turn into reality. When you hear or are told something all the time, it starts to become a part of who you are and what you think/believe. Our society very much dictates what is an appropriate and normal narrative through social construction (Greene & Lee, 2011). The socially constructed “truths” tend to be challenging for those individuals and/or groups that are seen as different from the dominant society (Green & Lee, 2011). There is a big importance put on making sure that the practitioner and client work together to maintain a collaborative relationship, just like in solution-focused therapy and strengths perspective (Green & Lee, 2011). As the name states, the client tell their stories, which is how they learn to be able to define and describe the problem at hand. Practitioners will then use certain questions in order to help enable client change to take place (Greene & Lee, 2011). The social worker will work with the client to externalize the problem and for the client to be able to alter their assumptions about reality and the problem at hand (Greene & Lee, 2011). To be able to get the clients to feel empowered, the clinician provide help so that the client can

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