Integrated Water Cycle Management Analysis

818 Words 4 Pages
As a city’s development increases rapidly, there is due course of action to meet the demands of water supply to individual households. Along with variations of local climates, factors such as financial and political aspects, has triggered major disruptions in the process of urban water management (Grigg, 2012). That is why an organised and efficient use of an Integrated Water Cycle Management system is critical. Normally, services for drinking water, wastewater and sewerage have been separate entities to each other, each having their own government regulations, laws and industries that run them. Integrated Water Cycle Management is a method used to incorporate all water resource objectives in ways that best implement community goals sustainably, …show more content…
(2013) and Jefferson et al. (2005) argue that the existing management approach to water relies too heavily on the prediction of rainfall and population demand for water. Moreover, this approach is now considered insufficient when reacting to unorthodox factors such as climate change. Due to ever expanding population growth, future demand for water resources will continue to increase in the next few decades, making solutions that are developed now essential to the future (Melbourne Water, 2016). Integrated Water Cycle Management must encapsulate these factors, along with allowing for housing types from entire states to individual households, development of technology and the constant assistance of all stakeholders e.g. government institutions. Chocat et al. (2007) explains that in order for the water system to remain functional, it must move from a traditional approach to a more integrated decentralised technological approach through the use of ‘fit-for-purpose’ methods. Jefferson et al. (2005) investigated a substitution method to produce a framework that incorporates all the possible advantages of alternative water sources, by meeting the demands of a growing society. Additionally, Khouri (2006) explains that integrated water cycle management creates new water service solutions, through ample tasks that combat population growth and the gruelling change in climate. By making sure that all aspects of water are covered, the aftermath of integrated water cycle …show more content…
According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (2016), Australia has massive amounts of potential water storage reigning in as the highest per capita in the world. However, there has been a significant fall equalling 18% in large dam storage levels due to drought conditions between the ‘El Nino’ years of 2002 and 2005 in Australia. Consequently, as a result of climate change, there has been a surge in intervals of tireless precipitation shortages, causing due concern for an adjustment in the way water is preserved and effectively recycled (Garbrecht and Piechota, 2005). With this in mind, governing institutions must envision a new way to increase water efficiency, looking at all aspects that encapsulate the most viable solutions of reusable water i.e. stormwater harvesting, greywater and sewerage. With factors such as these decrementing the current water systems practicality, new solutions must be researched in detail with regards to stormwater and

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