Institutional Discrimination Against Women

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Institutional discrimination against women comes in many forms. While employment and the accompanying processes are only one of the many ways that institutional discrimination is carried out, it affects society greatly. This happens through the wage gap, the sex typing of jobs, and barriers placed so women struggle in certain fields. The discrimination in employment is shaped by those who are in charge, who limit women’s employment through history, who discourage women’s education in certain areas, and who view all women as potential mothers. There has been push for equality in employment through legislation, although not everyone agrees with it and the legislation may have not yet created the equality intended. This discrimination is …show more content…
Some jobs seem to be associated with certain races and ethnicities and not with gender. For example, East and South Asian people are usually thought to be doctors or business-owners, jobs that require a high level of skill and education. However, some occupations, usually but not always in lower-paying fields, have associations with race and gender. For example, black men are usually seen as menacing and strong, so they tend to be associated with athletic jobs, such as basketball and football. Latino men are also seen as strong, but are usually associated with construction and other similar occupations. Similarly, nannies and house-cleaners tend to be associated with Southeast Asian and Latina women. This usually gets brought up in conversation when talking about undocumented citizens, a term that is used to talk about Latino people even though many are American citizens. Recently, when Donald Trump talked about deporting undocumented citizens, Kelly Osbourne replied with, “If you kick every Latino out of this country, then who is going to be cleaning your toilets, Donald Trump?” (RESOURCE). Although these jobs may not be racially segregated, or may not be officially documented, these stereotypes and associations still …show more content…
Men are associated with dominating personalities that make them qualified for upper-level positions. Statistically, men make up about 73% of chief executives, which has a higher median weekly pay at $2,127 than all of the other jobs in the top ten jobs for men, and all of the jobs in the top ten jobs for women (TEXTBOOK). This is, to a certain extent, the fault of hiring practices. Women are all considered potential wives and mothers when being hired, one source of systematic discrimination, where all women are judged to be the same (RESOURCE). This is because society tells women that they must get married and have children in order to be proper members of society. Those who put their careers first and do not have children are considered selfish, while those who do not get married are considered lonely and unhappy, insinuating that raising a family and being a housewife are inborn duties of a woman. And since there are some women who do want to get married and have children, women are thought to be fickle in the job market since they could require maternity leave or leave the workforce entirely. Therefore, even women who aspire to have highly esteemed jobs are passed over for promotions and jobs because society does not believe that they will stay. And women find that even when they do get promoted, there is a sort of “glass

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