Insanity In Edgar Allan Poe's The Tell Tale Heart

863 Words 4 Pages
“I was never kinder to the old man than the week before I killed him” (Poe, 2). Edgar Allan Poe was born in 1809, and lost both his parents when he was very young. He was adopted by John and Frances Allan. Eventually when he got older he grew apart from his foster parents due to his gambling addiction, and their relationship deteriorated. When Poe was grown he moved in with his grandmother and fell in love with his 14 year old cousin, Virginia. He married his cousin, who was his everything and she may have been the last string keeping him sane. He lost her to tuberculosis. Poe had gone through many losses, and could have lost some of his sanity through it all. The traumatic events Poe had experienced in his life could have influenced him to …show more content…
Poe uses repetition in order to draw attention to the narrator’s gradual fall into insanity. “Hark! Louder! Louder! Louder! Louder!” (Poe, 16). Poe repeats the word louder, in order to describe the heartbeat of the recently murdered old man. Poe uses repetition in order to convey the paranoia and anxiety going through the narrator’s mind, which in turn conveys the sanity (or lack of) of the narrator. Poe’s use of repetition adds to the already dark and ominous mood, and gives the whole text a frantic and unsettling tone. Overall, Poe’s use of repetition emphasizes the narrator’s paranoia and insanity which helps to create a more sinister mood, and a frantic …show more content…
In the poem by Edgar Allan PoeThe Raven” the narrator grieves over the loss of his loved Lenore, and hears a raven almost taunting him with the word nevermore. In “The Raven", Poe’s use of diction helps to create a dark undertone. “This I sat engaged in guessing, but no syllable expressing To the fowl whose fiery eyes now burned into my bosom's core; This and more I sat divining, with my head at ease reclining On the cushion's velvet lining that the lamplight gloated o'er, But whose velvet violet lining with the lamplight gloating o'er, She shall press, ah, nevermore!” (Poe, 13). Poe’s use of dark language in order to describe the setting contributes to a sinister mood, which also creates an ominous tone. Altogether, Poe’s use of mysterious diction produces a sinister

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