Injustices In Virginia Woolf's Society

1629 Words 7 Pages
Money seems to be an important basic aspect of this world, a fact that no one likes to accept but is willing to admit. Virginia Woolf depicts the injustices that are present in the Victorian Era between men and women that result from different economic statuses. The patriarchal society that was present in the past has contributed to how women had inferior education systems than the men simply because of their gender. In the modern world, the issue of unfair education still exists because it is based on the financial standing of the people living in the city. The women in Virginia Woolf’s time can directly link to impoverished people in the way that both are not provided a sufficient education which can cause them to have unpredictable and difficult …show more content…
The inequalities are represented by the different standards and sizes of education facilities the two genders are provided with. The fictional character, Mary, states that “every penny [she] earn[s]...will be taken from [her] and…[used to] found a scholarship or to endow a fellowship in Ballilol or Kings”2. The unequal distribution of wealth only widens the gap of social inequality, for only the men gain advantages by receiving a superior education. Through a Marxist critique, the money the women are being funded is a direct correlation to the type of education the women are receiving. Consequently, the lack of wealth the women acquire equates to the …show more content…
Unlike many women at the time, Woolf’s “ future career was certainly aided by her birth, in 1882, into a prominent, upper-middle-class London literary family”6 Woolf’s ability to compose many writing pieces may greatly be because she was financially stable, which allowed her to not worry about her next meal but rather spend time improving her education. Her security in money aided her talents in expressing her thoughts, as she had more time and materials to think and create art. Contrary to Woolf’s life, most women took on domestic roles, thus preventing them from having a proper career that well suited their unrealized talents. Some women “earned a few pounds by addressing envelopes, reading to old ladies, making artificial flowers, [and] teaching the alphabet”.7 Through a Marxist critique, these occupations require no intelligence nor education which further exemplifies how women are forced to “stand still” in society. Since the jobs were unsubstantial, the minimal pay they were given contributes to the endless cycle of poverty in where it was very unlikely for the women to get out of since they only dealt with a minimal amount of money. The nonexistent education the women were given perpetuates the idea of how significant the role of education plays in one’s future. Because of

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