Injustice In Malcolm X

1673 Words 7 Pages
Oppression. Inequality. Poverty. These injustices were the founding principles of the injustice Malcolm X fought to eradicate from American society. Growing up after his father died, Malcolm X moved from home to home. His mother could no longer support the family, causing the family to separate into different homes. Being sent from home to home, Malcolm X saw the differences between white and black society, and he learned to work within that system. Continuing to grow, he saw more and more injustice, which motivated him to become an activist for the cause. Throughout his life, he played many roles, known as personas, with different people. Throughout his life, Malcolm X displayed multiple personas including a helpless child, cheated …show more content…
Initially, the author created the persona of a helpless child to warm the reader up to the author and to begin the long journey towards fighting for equality. Malcolm X was born into a large and conservative family. One night his father went out of the house in a rage. Malcolm X told Haley that he can “remember waking up to the sound of my mother screaming again…. My mother was taken by the police to the hospital, and to a room where a sheet was over my father in a bed…. It was morning when we children at home got the word that he was dead” (Haley and Malcolm X 10). The trauma described helps the reader begin to understand the hardships the author had during his childhood. In addition, it allows the story to flow into his teenage years and adult years smoothly from his birth. Consequently, after the death of her husband, Malcolm X’s mother began to weaken and the state police wanted to remove the children from the home, setting him up for hardships in the future. Malcolm X recalled that “[t]he State Police saw her weakening. That was when they began the definite steps to take me away from home…. As my mother talked to herself more …show more content…
He shows concern for how to gain support for the movement through the white supporters. Malcolm X comments on this issue when he states that “[w]here the really sincere white people have got to do their ‘proving’ of themselves is not among the Black Victims, but out on the battle liens of where America’s racism really is-and that’s in their own home communities (Haley and Malcolm X 383). The fact that Malcolm X used the words “Black Victims” proves his engagement in the issue of equality in America. Also, his point is rather observant about where the battle lines are in the fight for equality. To continue, Malcolm X explores further down the path of black leadership. He begins by pondering the far-reaching ends of the civil rights movement when he explains that “in the racial climate of this country today, it is anybody’s guess which of the ‘extremes’ in approach to the Black Man’s problems might personally meet a fatal catastrophe first- ‘non violent’ Dr. King, or so- called ‘violent me’” (Haley and Malcolm X 385). As he explains the uncertainties of the civil rights issues, he makes a personal remark at the end that has a slight hint of bitterness. According to him, people view him as violent. Overall, the persona of an Activist not only acts as a stepping stone for his career in activism, but additionally allows the reader to view him as

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