To Kill A Mockingbird Impact On Society

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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is a book about three children, Jem Finch, Scout Finch and Dill Harris, and their experiences in their town Maycomb of Alabama. At the beginning of the book, the three children give off the sense of innocence and are naive to the facts of true society. Major changes are noticeably made to these three children as the story progresses. These alterations are mainly made by the influence of prejudice in their town. After being exposed to the true evils of the word involving racism and discrimination, Jem, Scout, and Dill change their views on society. The outcome of the trial of Tom Robinson made the biggest impact on Jem, Scout and Dill. Tom Robinson was a black man who lived in Maycomb and was accused of …show more content…
“Mockingbirds don’t do one thing but make music for us to enjoy,” (119). What he means is that mockingbirds are peaceful and do no harm. There is no reason for a mocking bird to be killed. This analogy can be related to characters in the book, such as Dill. Dill, a close friend of Jem and Scout, comes from a broken home and is “passed around from relative to relative,” (110). After Dill’s mom remarried, she furtherly neglects him, and Dill barely knows his father. Just like the mockingbird, Dill does not deserve the cruelty and mistreatment he receives. Dill’s unnecessary causes him to be more prone to recognizes …show more content…
“How could they do it? How could they,” (285). The outcome of Tom’s trial exposed the truth of Maycomb to Jem. The adults he once looked up to he now realizes are toxic with their nature of hate and racial prejudice. Against what most whites in Maycomb believe, Jem believes that although Tom is black, it does not mean he has committed such a crime as raping a young woman. Most are quick to assume and quick to punish Tom, such as the Ewells and perhaps the Cunninghams. As Jem learns certain behaviors, he starts to grasp the concept of different types of people and why they do not get along. A conversation of different types of people arises when Scout insists on befriending Walter Cunningham. “If there’s just one kind of folks, why can’t they get along with each other? If they’re all alike, why do they go out of their way to despise each other,” (304). The Finches and the Cunninghams will never truly be allies to do the sole reason that they do not have the same beliefs. The theory of different kinds of people is the big contributing factor to Jem understanding Boo Radley. “I think I’m beginning to understand something. I think I’m beginning to understand why Boo Radley’s stayed shut up in the house all this time… it’s because he wants to stay inside,” (304). The reason for Boo Radley’s lack of existence in the town is more than likely due to the fact that he just does not blend with others. He

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